Posts Tagged ‘Warner Baxter’

Celebrity Christmas Cards

Friday, December 24th, 2010

HAPPY HOLIDAYS

Hollywood Christmas Cards

 

 (lapl)

 

By Alma Whitaker
Christmas 1928

 

Christmas Eve round the fire – opening joyous piles of Christmas cards. Perhaps not quite so many utterly luxurious ones from Hollywood this year – because, oh, well, the “talkies” and other things have marred the prosperity of a few.

 

Five beautiful religious ones. Mr. and Mrs. Gardiner (Louise Dresser) send an exquisite Madonna and Babe, with lambs, against a Holy Land background, the whole giving a church window effect. Mr.  and Mrs. Antonio Moreno, a blissful Holy Baby, seemingly sleeping in a celestial spotlight. Ramon Novarro an impressionistic version of the Madonna and Babe, outlined in heavy blue with golden haloes. John Boyce Smith, a white embossed view of the Holy Land, with camels and donkeys, palms and mosques, against a golden sky.

 

Lina Basquette, a snow mountain against a black sky, with two elongated emaciated sleighers floating down it. Doris Dawson, gilded Christmas trees against a turquoise sky and an unknown animal. Mr. and Mrs. Edmund Lowe, two elongated attenuated dancers on a few blue leaves.

 

Tec-Art Studios go in for heavy parchment, a terra cotta city and a palm higher than a church steeple. Billie Dove and Irving Willat send three emaciated reindeer racing down a black rainbow across a purple sky, with a yellow moon. Fanchon Royer’s card, red on silver, shows a very Mephistophelian gentleman apparently making offerings to some Christmas candles. Warner Baxter goes in for black and gold voluptuous architecture against a gray sky striped with red and gold.

 

Elegant simplicity is favored by Dick Barthelmess – white embossed crest on an expensive white background, and no vulgar originality about the greeting. Bebe Daniels has a gold crest on aristocratic gray, winged griffin rampant, motto, “Semper Paratus.” Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Goldwyn’s crest on gold and red is made up of a red S and gold G. Lois Weber and Harry Gantz send chaste open-work greetings in gold. William Cowan and Leonore Coffee’s crest is apparently a fist with a laurel wreath – motto, “Invictus maneo.” Estelle Taylor leaves Jack [Dempsey] off her cards and sends “Estelle” laced into a tulip leaf.

 

Now we come to the intentionally comic. Distinctive among these is a regular bill poster from James Cruze and Betty Compson, filled with naughty caricatures of their guests. That one deserves a story all to itself. Every kind of guest gets a dirty dig – the one who drinks too much, stays too late, sits on good chairs in wet bathing suits, makes tactless remarks, ruins flower beds, et al. Well, the only time they invited me, they forgot – and had already dined. I’m going to get a naughty one out on hosts one of these days.

 

Johnny Hines pictures himself playing golf and shouting “Fore” – “for good times”… which, really now, might be telling ‘em to get out of the way. Colleen Moore, made up as Topsy, is gazing woefully at us from a green card, and the greeting properly Topsyish – in Colleen’s own hand-writing. Katherine Albert sends greetings in ten languages – but no English. Francine and Morse Mason come violently cubistic and very nude. The Milton Sills send three pairs of socks on a laundry line – ostensibly belonging to Milton, Doris and Baby. Dorothy Yost and Dwight Cummings give us a Christmas scenario of ourselves. Ida Koverman could not resist a touch of politics – big candles, elephants, amongst the persiflage, on wrapping paper. Some of the other “comic” ones are a trifle labored, so we won’t expose them.

 

And then come the pile of the simple little ordinary cards – the kind I send myself. Some of them with darling little personal messages, all of them sweetly sentimental, some of them home-made – every whit as precious as the expensive, gorgeous ones. Most of those listed above are frightfully stylish, and came in envelopes as grand as the cards themselves. I counted fifteen that cost over 10 cents postage!

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The Mystery of Life?

Saturday, October 3rd, 2009

FOREST LAWN SCULPTURE

Ah, Sweet ‘Mystery of Life’

 

Mystery of Life-then

 

THE MYSTERY OF LIFE is the largest piece of statuary in Forest Lawn Memorial Park — measuring over 17 feet in width and containing 22 life size figures. Critics regard this statur, the workd of Ernesto Gazzeri, one fo the world’s greatest sculptural masterpieces. The sculptor has chosen to leave the interpretation to each individual observer.  (from the back of the post card circa 1930s)

 

Mystery of Life

 

THE MYSTERY OF LIFE monument as it looks today. The above description must have been before they installed the reproduction of Michelangelo’s  “David” in the courtyard adjoining this garden.

 

The following is Forest Lawn’s religious interpretation of The Mystery of Life statue taken from a pictorial catalogue the cemetery published in 1944:

 

mysteryoflife-2

 

“Around the mystic Stream of Life we see grouped eighteen persons typifying many walks and stations in life. First we see…”

 

1.  – a boy, who is astonished at the miracle that has happened in his hand — one moment, an unbroken egg; the next moment, a chick, teeming with life. “Why?” he asks. “How does it happen? What is the answer to this Mystery of Life?” He questions…

2.  – his aged grandmother, who, he reasons, knows everything. But we see her resigned in the face of the inexplicable. Then we see…

3 and 4.  – the lovers, who believe they have found the answer to the mystery in their first kiss.

5. – the sweet girl graduate, lost in dreams, with no place as yet in her thoughts for a serious questioning of Life’s destiny.

6.  – the scientist, troubled because all his learnings, all his searchings, have not solved the mystery.

7 and 8.  – the mother, who finds the answer in the babe at her breast.

9, 10, 11, 12, 13.  – the happy family group, not really perturbed by the mystery, although even they seem to ask: “Why do the doves mate?”

14.  the learned philosopher, scratching his puzzled head in vain.

15 and 16.  – the monk and the nun, comforted and secure, confident that they have found the answer in their religion.

17.  – the atheist, the fool, who grinningly cares not at all, while

18.  – the stoic, sits in silent awe and comtemplation of that which he believes he knows but cannot explain or understand.

 

And, to the left of this sculpture is a private garden containing the earthly remains of Mary Pickford (1893-1979), Warner Baxter (1891-1951), Humphrey Bogart (1899-1957), evangelist Kathryn Kuhlman (1907-1976), Earl Carrol (1893-1948) and his girlfriend Beryl Wallace (1910-1948) and Joan Crawford’s ‘Mommie Dearest’ — Anna Le Sueur (1884-1958).

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Edwin Carewe Marked at Hollywood Forever

Saturday, September 12th, 2009

Edwin Carewe (with megaphone) directing a scene as Mabel Normand looks on

Recently at Hollywood Forever, I discovered that the grave of director Edwin Carewe had a grave stone installed after more than 69 years of being unmarked. I don’t know who marked him but it is always great news when someone that has been forgotten finally gets identified with a marker. The director, who discovered Dolores Del Rio and many other famous stars, died in Hollywood on January 22, 1940 from an apparent heart attack.

Edwin Carewe was born Jay Fox in Gainesville, Texas on March 5, 1883. He attended the University of Texas and the University of Missouri majoring in dramatics. Early in his career when his flair for acting was expressed, a fellow New York actor suggested that he change his name, thinking that Fox was not good professionally. So he took the name Edwin from his favorite actor, Edwin Booth, and for his last name chose to use that of a character that he was playing in stock.

Carewe’s first stage experience was with the Dearborn Stock Company and he made his debut on Broadway with Chauncey Olcott. He appeared in plays with such stage actors as Otis Skinner, Rose Coghlan and Laurette Taylor in New York, Philadelphia, Washington, Chicago and Los Angeles. Later, he entered motion pictures in 1912 with the Lubin Company.

As a director, he produced such films as Resurrection (1927), Ramona (1928), Revenge (1928), Evangeline (1929), and The Spoilers (1930), winning fame for its realistic fight scenes. Besides Del Rio, he encouraged the talents of Warner Baxter, Wallace Beery, Francis X. Bushman and Gary Cooper. His brother, Finis Fox (1884-1949), wrote many of his scenarios.

Over his career, Carewe directed films for Metro, Paramount, First National, Fox and others and at one time had his own lot, Tec-Art, on Melrose Avenue, opposite Paramount, where he made his biggest successes.

In 1925, he and actress Mary Aikin (whom he also discovered), eloped to Mexico. There he met Jaime Del Rio and his wife Dolores. He suggested that she return with him to Hollywood for a screen career. Carewe helped Dolores Del Rio become one of the biggest stars in silent films.

At one time Carewe was considered a millionaire. His percentage on Ramona and Resurrection, both with Del Rio, was close to $400,000. However he lost most of his fortune in a Texas garbage disposal deal.

Carewe’s health began to fail in July 1939 when he had a heart attack while driving his car and was taken to St. Vincent’s Hospital. Not wishing to remain in the hospital, his doctor’s would only allow him to leave if someone was constantly with him. He agreed to move to 5603 Lexington Avenue in Hollywood into an apartment across the hall from his nephew, Winston Platt.

On January 22, 1940, a doctor was summoned to Carewe’s apartment and administered a sedative to him around 4 a.m. Carewe fell asleep and Platt stretched out on a couch in the next room. At 8 a.m. Platt was awakened and found his uncle dead.

Edwin Carewe died in his apartment here at 5603 Lexington Avenue, Hollywood.

Funeral services were conducted at the Pierce Brothers Mortuary (across from Hollywood Cemetery) by Rev. Willsie Martin of the Wilshire Blvd. Methodist Episcopal Church. More than 200 of Carewe’s friends gathered to pay their final farewell.

Among those who attended were Dolores Del Rio, garbed in black, who sat in front with her husband, Cedric Gibbons, the art director at MGM. She sobbed throughout the rites.

Edwin Carewe’s death certificate (click on image to enlarge).

On the whole, the chapel was filled with property men, electricians, cameramen, carpenters, grips, painters, other technicians and friends who made up the director’s crews when he was filming. Others who were present included Charles Murray, Guido Orlando, Rex Lease, Eddie Silton, William Farnum, Ivy Wilson, Wilford Lucas, James Gordon, Hank Mann, Roland Drew, George Renault, John Le Roy Johnston, John Boles and John Hintz.

In the ceremony and eulogy, Dr. Martin touched briefly on his pioneer endeavors in films and his making of Are We Civilized? (1934), his final film.

“He never failed a friend, he never carried bitterness in his heart and he was generous to a fault – a great attribute,” Martin said. “He was a man who never quit, a test of a thorough bred.”

Besides his widow, Mary Aiken, Carewe left five children, Sally Ann, William Edwin, Carol Lee, Rita and Mary Jane and two brothers, Finis and Wallace Fox.

After his interment at Hollywood Cemetery in 1940, Carewe’s grave went unmarked – until recently when an unknown benefactor placed a stone there.

Edwin Carewe’s grave is located in Section One, Grave 471, in the northeast part of the cemetery, very near to the east wall, in the same area as Flora Finch.

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