Posts Tagged ‘Olympics’

Olympic Posters…

Sunday, August 17th, 2008

1896-1936

Olympic Posters

 

ATHENS 1896

 

 

PARIS 1900

 

 

ST. LOUIS 1904

 

 

LONDON 1908

 

STOCKHOLM 1912

 

 

ANTWERP 1920

 

PARIS 1924

 

 

AMSTERDAM 1928

 

LOS ANGELES 1932

 

 

BERLIN 1936

 

NOTE: The 1916 Olympics was not held because of World War I

 

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Michael Phelps Does It!…

Saturday, August 16th, 2008

 BREAKING NEWS

Eighth wonder! Phelps wins record gold

 

Brendan Hanson, left, Aaron Peirsol and Michael Phelps react as Jason Lezak brings home the gold in world record time during the men’s 4 x 100m medley relay swimming final . (Carl De Souza/AFP/Getty Images)

 

By Randy Harvey

 

BEIJINGBob Beamon won a gold medal 40 years ago with a long jump that still stands as an Olympic record. It was such an amazing jump that feats considered comparable for years to become were called Beamonesque.

Will spectacular achievements now be known as Phelpsian? The remarkable Michael Phelps won his eighth gold medal Sunday, breaking Mark Spitz’s single Games record of seven gold medals that stood almost as long as Beamon’s, 36 years.

 

Phelps, 23, of Baltimore, won the record breaker in a relay, the 400-meter medley. Unlike the 400 freestyle relay last Monday, in which his record quest was kept alive by Jason Lezak’s phenomenal come-from-behind anchor leg, Phelps had to rely to a great extent on himself in this one.

 

The United States was in third place when he dived into the water on the third leg, the butterfly. He swam it in 50.15, more than seventh-tenths ahead of Japan’s Takuro Fujii, who had hit the water first, and almost a full second ahead of Australia’s Andrew Lauterstien, who had dived in just ahead of Phelps.

 

He handed over a relatively comfortable lead to Jason Lezak, whose heroics weren’t necessary this time to bring the United States home in a world-record time of 3:29.34. Australia finished second in 3:30.04. Japan was third in 3:31.18.

 

In eight finals, Phelps either produced or helped produce seven world records.

 

“It’s been such an unbelievable roller coaster,” Phelps said. “It’s been such an unbelievable ride. With so many people saying it couldn’t be done, all it took was a little imagination.

 

“I don’t know what to feel right now. It’s so emotional. All I want to do is go see my mom.”

 

For his career, Phelps now has 14 gold medals, five more than anyone else in history, and 16 medals, second only to Soviet gymnast Laryssa Latynina’s 18.

 

London calling?

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Phelps Ties with Spitz…

Friday, August 15th, 2008

BREAKING NEWS

Michael Phelps speeds to 7th gold

 

 

Michael Phelps celebrates winning the gold in the men’s 100-meter butterfly final. (Mark J. Terrill / Associated Press)

 

By Randy Harvey 

 

BEIJINGMilo Cavic, the Serbian who grew up in Tustin, said he wanted to be the spoiler in Michael Phelps’ quest to become the first athlete to win seven gold medals in a single Olympics since Mark Spitz. Cavic almost pulled it off.

 

Phelps won the 100-meter butterfly Saturday, but it was his closet individual race yet. Cavic appeared to make a mistake right at the end, gliding after the last stroke instead of swimming all the way to the wall, and enabled Phelps to touch first.

 

Although it was the seventh gold for Phelps, it was the first time he hasn’t set or been part of a world record here. He won in an Olympic record of 50.68. Cavic was second in 50.59.

 

Cavic, who swam for UC Berkeley, dominated the first half of the race, swimming the first 50 in 23.42. Phelps actually was sixth in the eight-man final at 24.04. But he came on strong in the final 50, setting up his attempt to break the all-time record when he swims in the 400 medley relay Sunday (Saturday night in Los Angeles). If he wins, that will give him eight gold medals for Beijing and 14 for his remarkable career.

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Olympians Who Became Stars…

Thursday, August 14th, 2008

OLYMPICS SPECIAL

 

Many of the Olympic athletes and medal winners over the past 112 years have become household names including Jim Thorpe, Jesse Owens, Cassius Clay (Muhammad Ali), Joe Frazier, Mark Spitz, Peggy Fleming and Bruce Jenner, just to name a few. However, only a handful have gone on to successful film careers. Following are five Olympic medalists who also made a name for themselves on screen:

 

 

 Johnny Weismuller

 

 

 

  

Olympic Medal record

Men’s swimming

Gold

1924 Paris

100 m freestyle

 

Gold

1924 Paris

400 m freestyle

 

Gold

1924 Paris

4×200 m freestyle relay

 

Gold

1928 Amsterdam

100 m freestyle

 

Gold

1928 Amsterdam

4×200 m freestyle relay

 

Men’s water polo

Bronze

1924 Paris

Team

 

  

JOHNNY WEISMULLER (June 2, 1904, Freidorf, Banat, Austria-Hungary (now Romania) — January 20, 1984, Acapulco, Mexico).

 

He won five gold medals as a swimmer at the 1924 and 1928 Olympics, setting many free-style records. Weissmuller appeared in several sports shorts, then was hired by MGM to play Tarzan onscreen. Beginning in 1932, he starred in 12 Tarzan adventures, meanwhile doing almost no other film work. In the late ’40s he quit Tarzan and began starring in a new series, Jungle Jim, while occasionally appearing in other films through the mid ’50s, after which he retired from acting. He was married six times. His stormy marriage to actress Lupe Velez (1933-38) received much coverage in scandal sheets. He authored an autobiography, Water, World and Weissmuller (1967). ~ All Movie Guide 

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 Sonja Henie

 

 

 

   

Olympic Medal record

Ladies Figure skating

Gold

1928 St. Moritz

Singles

Gold

1932 Lake Placid

Singles

Gold

1936 Garmisch-Partenkirchen

Singles

 

SONJA HENIE (April 8, 1912, Kristiania (Oslo), Norway — October 12, 1969, en route by air to Oslo, Norway)

 

Upon receiving a pair of skates for her sixth birthday, Norwegian entertainer Sonja Henie decided to forego a dancing career for a life on the ice. To refine her technique, Henie continued taking ballet lessons, at one point studying with a former teacher of Anna Pavlova. She won the first of her ten World Skating titles in Oslo at age 14; she went on to win honors at the 1928, 1932 and 1936 Olympics. In 1936 she turned professional, touring the world in her own ice show. Thus, Henie was already a very wealthy woman when she was signed to a Hollywood contract at 20th Century-Fox. From her American film debut in One in a Million (1936) onward, Henie was one of Fox’s biggest box-office attractions. Her film career waned in the late 1940s, but Henie retained her popularity through her sellout appearances with the Hollywood Ice Capades and via sporadic television appearances. In 1960, Sonja Henie retired, a millionaire many times over; nine years later, she died of leukemia while flying on an ambulance plane from Paris to Oslo. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide

  

 

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 Buster Crabbe

 

 

 

  

Olympic medal record

Men’s swimming

Gold

1932 Los Angeles

400 m freestyle

Bronze

1928 Amsterdam

1500 m freestyle

 

BUSTER CRABBE (February 17, 1907, Oakland, California — April 23, 1983, Scottsdale, Arizona) 

  

Athletic actor Buster Crabbe, born Clarence Crabbe, grew up in Hawaii where he developed into a first-rate swimmer and athlete, going on to win the gold medal in 400-meter swimming at the 1932 Olympics (he broke the record held by another actor-athlete, Johnny Weissmuller). After the Olympics he found work in Hollywood playing Tarzan, branching out from this character to eventually play Flash Gordon, Billy the Kid, and Buck Rogers, among other action heroes. He became enormously popular with young audiences for his appearances in many serials and action flicks of the ’30s and ’40s, and ultimately starred in over 100 films. He also made westerns (in the ’40s he was teamed with sidekick Al “Fuzzy” St. John), and was on the list of Top Ten Western Stars at the box office in 1936. Crabbe went on to star in the ’50s TV series Captain Gallant, which also featured his son Cullen “Cuffy” Crabbe. He considerably slowed down his acting output in the ’50s and ’60s, becoming the athletic director for a resort hotel in the Catskills and investing in the swimming pool business. He also authored ~Energetics, a book on physical fitness for people over 50. Crabbe later returned to the screen once, for a large role in The Alien Dead (1980). ~ All Movie Guide

 

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 Herman Brix (Bruce Bennett)

 

 

 

   

Olympic medal record

Men’s Athletics

Silver

1928 Amsterdam

Shot put

 

HERMAN BRIX / BRUCE BENNETT (May 19, 1906, Tacoma, Washington — February 24, 2007, Santa Monica, California)

  

When Tarzan creator Edgar Rice Burroughs set about to produce his own talking pictures based on his jungle-man creation, he decided to emulate the example of the MGM Tarzan pictures, which starred Olympic champion Johnny Weissmuller. Using the 1932 Olympics as his talent pool, Burroughs selected shot-put champ Herman Brix, who’d already played a few bits in such films as Student Tour (1934) and Death on the Diamond (1934). Brix was quickly dispatched to Guatemala to film the 12-chapter serial The New Adventures of Tarzan (1935). In 1937, Brix took some time off to learn the rudiments of acting, then re-emerged on screen in 1938 with a new name: Bruce Bennett. His parts increased in size and importance when he moved to Warner Bros. in 1945; here he was assigned such choice roles as Joan Crawford’s ex-husband in Mildred Pierce (1945) and the lone prospector who is killed off in the middle of Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948). A ubiquitous second lead and character actor throughout the 1950s, Bruce Bennett left films in the early 1960s to make a bundle in real estate, briefly returning before the cameras in 1972. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide

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 Duke Kahanamoku

 

 

 

 

Olympic Medal record

Men’s swimming

Gold

1912 Stockholm

100 m freestyle

Gold

1920 Antwerp

100 m freestyle

Gold

1920 Antwerp

4×200 m freestyle relay

Silver

1912 Stockholm

4×200 m freestyle relay

Silver

1924 Paris

100 m freestyle

 

DUKE KAHANAMOKU (August 24, 1890, Honolulu, Kingdon of Hawaii — January 22, 1968, Honolulu, Hawaii)

 

The winner of the 100-meter freestyle swimming event at the 1912 Stockholm Olympics, Hawaiian star athlete Duke Kahanamoku repeated that feat at the games at Antwerp, Belgium, six years later, finishing second to Johnny Weissmuller at the 1924 Paris Olympics. Kahanamoku attempted to cash in on his fame by appearing in such Hollywood potboilers as Lord Jim (1926) and the Mascot serial The Isle of Sunken Gold (1927), but screen producers saw him mostly as an exotic villain or the odd South Seas Island native and true stardom eluded him. Better known perhaps for his surfing ability, Kahanamoku continued to make screen appearances through John Ford’s Mister Roberts (1955), in which he once again played a Native chief. His death in 1968 was attributed to a heart attack. ~ Hans J. Wollstein, All Movie Guide

 

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Reginald “Snowy” Baker at Hollywood Forever…

Sunday, August 10th, 2008

OLYMPICS SPECIAL

 

HOLLYWOOD FOREVER CEMETERY

Reginald “Snowy” Baker

 

 

AUSTRALIAN OLYMPIAN

 

BORN: February 8, 1884, Surry Hills, Syndey, Australia

DIED: December 2, 1953, Hollywood, California

CAUSE OF DEATH: Cerebro-vascular disease

BURIAL: Hollywood Forever Cemetery, Colonnade, North Wall, T-3, N-11

 

By Allan R. Ellenberger

 

Reginald Leslie “Snowy” Baker was arguably Australia’s greatest all-round athlete. Called “Snowy” from childhood because of his very blond hair, he first gained international fame when he represented Australia in boxing at the Olympic Games in London in 1908. He also was an expert equestrian, footballer, wrestler, fencer, swimmer and diver. His other sports included water polo, sailing, soccer and Rugby.

 

He remains the only Australian to have represented the nation in three separate sports at the Olympic Games, and he played rugby union for Australia against the touring Great Britain team in 1904. In Australia he was a member of the famed Sydney Lancers, a military riding group.

 

At the London 1908 Olympics, Baker competed in the boxing, swimming and springboard diving, winning a Silver Medal in the middleweight boxing division after losing narrowly on points in a hard-fought encounter with Britain’s J.W.H.T. (“Johnny Won’t Hit Today”) Douglas. Baker’s Olympic boxing performance has been matched by only one other Australian – light-welterweight Grahame ‘Spike’ Cheney, who won silver in Seoul in 1988.

 

Baker and his wife came to the United States in 1920 and he became a friend of Douglas Fairbanks Sr., appearing in fourteen films and producing three of them. He was an expert boomerang thrower and bullwhip cracker, reportedly teaching the art to actor Lash LaRue. He at one time owned a string of ponies and taught many Hollywood celebrities the art of polo.

 

Baker had a varied post-Olympic career, most notably as a boxing referee, boxing promoter, entrepreneur, writer, actor, film-maker, and Hollywood stuntman. He performed stunts in the film National Velvet (1944) and reportedly taught Elizabeth Taylor how to ride a horse.

 

He was instrumental in creating the polo fields at the Riviera Country Club (Pacific Palisades) and became a director and major operating partner there for at least two decades. During the 1932 Olympics in Los Angeles, he was both Australia’s team attaché and a perceptive correspondent for the Sydney Referee

 

In 1951, Baker became ill and died two years later at age 69 of cerebro-vascular disease at his home at 226 N. Irving Boulevard. He was cremated and interred at Hollywood Cemetery. ‘Snowy’ Baker was survived by his wife Ethel and a step-daughter.

 

 

Reginald “Snowy” Bakers cremation urn at Hollywood Forever

 

 

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