Posts Tagged ‘Hollywood Heritage Museum in the Lasky-DeMille Barn’

Hollywood Events

Sunday, May 4th, 2014

HOLLYWOOD EVENTS

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HOLLYWOOD

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When visiting the Hollywood/Los Angeles area, be sure to take in many of the cultural events available to the public from the following organizations:

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UCLA Film and Television Archive:

Billy Wilder Theater

10899 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles

(310) 206-8013

For a listing of all events, please go to:

http://www.cinema.ucla.edu/

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Hollywood Forever Cemetery

The Masonic Lodge

Cinespia

6000 Santa Monica Blvd., Hollywood

Questions: email events@hollywoodforever.com

For more information, please go to:

http://www.hollywoodforever.com/culture

http://cinespia.org/

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Cinefamily at Silent Movie Theatre

611 N. Fairfax Avenue, Los Angeles

(323) 655-2510

For a listing of all events, please go to:

http://www.cinefamily.org/

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The Hollywood Heritage Museum in the Lasky-DeMille Barn

2100 N. Highland Avenue

(across from the Hollywood Bowl)

(323) 874-2276

For more information, please go to:

http://www.hollywoodheritage.org/

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Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences

Events and Exhibitions

Various locations

For more information, please go to:

http://www.oscars.org/events-exhibitions/

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Hollywood Heritage Celebrates 75th Anniversary of “Gone with the Wind”

Saturday, March 22nd, 2014

HOLLYWOOD HERITAGE

HERITAGE

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 GWTW-HH

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To reserve tickets for this event, click HERE 

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The Hollywood Heritage Museum is located at 2100 N. Highland Ave., Hollywood, across from the Hollywood Bowl at the South end of the Fairfield parking lot. Entrance on Odin St. 323-874-2276.

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PARKING IS FREE

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If you are not currently a Hollywood Heritage member, please consider joining today. If you are a member, please be sure your membership is active.
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Hollywood Heritage is a California State 501 (3) (c) non-profit and membership and donations are tax-deductibe to the full extent of the law.  
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Membership Application

Hollywood Heritage | hollywoodheritage@gmail.com | http://www.hollywoodheritage.org
P.O. Box 2586
Hollywood, CA 90078

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The Story of the Lasky-DeMille Barn

Sunday, December 22nd, 2013

HOLLYWOOD HISTORY

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This month celebrates one-hundred years since director Cecil B. DeMille arrived in Los Angeles and rented a barn in the sleepy village of Hollywood to make The Squaw Man.

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By Allan R. Ellenberger

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Paramount Pictures traces its beginnings back to the founding of Adolph Zukor’s Famous Players Film Company on June 1, 1912. In 1916, Zukor merged his company with the Jesse L. Lasky Feature Play Company, and with the Paramount Distributing Corp., a subsidiary. The new studio became Famous Players-Lasky Corporation and their films would be distributed under the Paramount name. In 1927 the organization was reorganized under the name Paramount Famous Lasky Corporation. In 1935, the Famous-Lasky name was dropped and the studio officially became Paramount Pictures.

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During Paramount’s acquisition of the Lasky Feature Play Company, the studio inherited an unpretentious, at least by Hollywood standards, wooden barn. The origins of that barn have had several incarnations. This is one version.

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In 1913, Jesse Lasky, a thirty-three year-old vaudeville producer, knew very little about films and how they were made. What he did know was that the fairly new entertainment medium was cutting into his stage show business. One day as Lasky and his partner, Cecil B. DeMille were going over the plans for the 1913-1914 Vaudeville season, DeMille dropped a bomb on his friend and partner.  DeMille was having problems living on his royalties and his debts were piling up, so he told Lasky he wanted to quit Broadway and go on an adventure. There was a revolution going on in Mexico and he thought about going there. Lasky did not want to lose his best friend so he blurted out an idea that another friend, Sam Goldfish (he later took the name Samuel Goldwyn) had been trying to interest him in—the movies.  Suddenly Lasky made a suggestion. “If you want adventure,” Lasky told him, “I’ve got an even better idea—let’s make some movies.”

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DeMille grabbed his hand and said, “Let’s.”

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“A portion of the motion-picture industry was built on that one word,” Lasky later said.

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From left: Jesse Lasky, Samuel Goldfish (Goldwyn) and Cecil B. DeMille

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But Lasky had one condition. He had seen a four-reel feature starring Sarah Bernhardt called Queen Elizabeth (1912) which Adolph Zukor of the Famous Players Film Company had imported from France for exhibition. If they were going to do this, he wanted to “do it in a big way and make a long picture like Queen Elizabeth.”

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After lunch they adjourned to the Lamb’s Club on West Forty-Fourth Street to discuss the details. At the club they ran into actor, Dustin Farnum and, while explaining their idea, asked him if he would star in a long feature they were going to produce. Looking around the room, Farnum saw Edwin Milton Royle the author of The Squaw Man. “You get Royle to sell you The Squaw Man and I might agree to join you,” Farnum told them.

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After some discussion, Royle was open to negotiating so Lasky called Goldfish and told him “they were in business.”

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The Jesse L. Lasky Feature Play Company was formed with Lasky as president, Goldfish the general manager, and DeMille would be the director-general. They each held a quarter of the stock and Farnum agreed to take the other quarter instead of receiving a salary. They paid $15,000 for the rights to The Squaw Man.

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At first they planned to film it Fort Lee, New Jersey, just across the river from New York, but Lasky didn’t think that would satisfy DeMille’s penchant for adventure, so he suggested they go to Flagstaff, Arizona where he knew there were real Indians. “It did not seem necessary for us to go to the then new Hollywood, so we looked at the map and selected Flagstaff, Arizona, as a pretty good name for our producing town,” Lasky said.  

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DeMille was agreeable but Farnum balked at the proposal. As long as he could live at home and work across the river he was willing to be paid off in stock, but if he had to travel across the country, he wanted his salary in cash. With the entire proposition on the verge of collapse, Lasky convinced his wife’s uncle and brother to invest and purchase Farnum’s stock. Reportedly, if Farnum had held onto the stock for eight years, he could have sold it for almost $2,000,000.

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The new producers hired a cameraman with his own camera and they engaged Oscar Apfel to help direct the production. Lasky and Goldfish remained in New York and attended to the sales and financial details as DeMille and Farnum took the train west.

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When DeMille finally arrived at Flagstaff, it was raining, so they boarded the train again and continued west to Hollywood. Once there, he sent a telegram to Lasky: “Flagstaff no good for our purpose,” DeMille wired, “Have proceeded to California. Want authority to rent barn in place called Hollywood for $75 a month. Regards to Sam. Cecil.”

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Goldfish was furious. Lasky defended DeMille’s decision even though he was not sure it was the right one. After arguing for hours they finally agreed to let the company stay in Hollywood. “Authorize you to rent barn but on month-to-month basis,” Lasky wired back, “Don’t make any long commitment. Regards. Jesse and Sam.”

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The barn that became their studio was located in a grove of orange and lemon trees on the southeast corner of Selma and Vine. Built in 1895, it was once a part of the estate of Colonel Robert Northam, whose mansion was located across the street where the Broadway building now stands. In 1904, Northam sold the estate to Jacob Stern, a realtor who, in March of that year, sold the barn to Harry Revier, a producer-director. In December 1913, Revier rented it to DeMille.

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Remodeling the barn into a studio to fit their needs began immediately. The horse stalls were removed and the space gained was transformed into a storage area for equipment the company hoped to buy. The carriage stand was turned into offices, a projection room and a primitive laboratory. The washing block was surrounded by walls and called a vault and the hay and feed section was made into an office, shared by DeMille and Lasky. A 30-foot square platform was built to adjoin the barn on the south side. This platform, the company’s first stage, was covered with a sail rigged to a mast, which could be adjusted to regulate sunlight.

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Shortly, DeMille wired Lasky that production was starting the next day. On December 29, 1913, DeMille ordered “camera” for the first scene of The Squaw Man. The excitement that the production was finally beginning convinced Lasky to come out to Hollywood.

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When Lasky arrived at the old Santa Fe Station, he told a taxi driver that he wanted to go to Hollywood. “He gave me a puzzled look,” Lasky recalled, “but said, ‘Get in boss—we’ll find it.’” After conferring with other drivers at the Alexandria Hotel, they found their way over dirt roads, past endless orchards and the occasional farmhouse until they came to the Hollywood Hotel. Lasky introduced himself to the clerk and made inquiries about the film company.

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“This is my first trip here and I’m not sure where our studio is located,” he told the clerk. “Would you please direct me?”

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“I’m sorry,” said the clerk, “I never heard of it.”

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“Perhaps I should have told you that the director-general of the company is Cecil B. DeMille,” Lasky stated.

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“Never heard of him,” the clerk said. Disappointed, Lasky was leaving when the clerk called him back.

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“Tell you who might help you,” he said. “Drive down this main road till you come to Vine Street. You can’t miss it—it’s a dirt road with a row of pepper trees right down the middle. Follow the pepper trees for about two blocks till you see an old barn. There’s some movie folks working there that might know where your company is.”

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When Lasky heard “barn” he knew he had the right place. He found the barn at Selma and Vine with a sign that identified it as the Jesse L. Lasky Feature Play Company. When he opened the door he heard someone say: “There’s the chief.” Outside there was a two-ton Ford truck with the company’s name inscribed on its side. When DeMille saw him, he grabbed his hand and gathered the company around and gave a speech of welcome. Afterward he had a photographer take a photo of Lasky and the company against the truck.

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Cecil B. DeMille (right) directs a scene from “The Squaw Man”

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DeMille finished The Squaw Man in three weeks, and Oscar Apfel took over the one stage for his production of Brewster’s Millions (1914), another successful stage play. Edward Abeles, who had starred in the stage production, was brought to Hollywood for the film, which was followed by The Master Mind (1914) and The Only Son (1914).

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When The Squaw Man was released, Lasky received a telegram of congratulation from Adolph Zukor, then president of Famous Players. Lasky thought it was generous of him to do so and knew the value of the telegraphic dispatch so he asked Zukor’s permission to use his congratulatory message in their advertising.

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Further improvements were made on the barn and the studio lot. In May 1914, electrical illumination was used for the first time to augment sunlight, when tow spotlights arrived from the East and were used in the production of Steward Edward White’s story, The Call of the North (1914). Meanwhile, the studio was expanding. The platform attached to the barn was outgrown, and a larger, open-air stage was constructed. This received the title of Stage Number One, and when the end of this stage was glassed over, Stage Number One became the pride of the studio and the wonder of Hollywood. Sheds extending from the Selma Avenue side of the barn formed the cutting rooms, carpenter and paint shops, and the first dressing rooms were constructed.

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The first feature film to be made on this stage was DeMille’s Rose of the Rancho (1914). This picture marked a definite step forward in the life of the studio, for this was the first film which was shot, in part, on location away from the stages. At this period the first major influx of stars started. H.B. Warner, Max Figman, Theodore Roberts and Mabel Van Buren joined the Lasky forces. Dustin Farnum returned to the studio to star in the first film version of Owen Wister’s novel, The Virginian (1914), under DeMille’s direction. In the east, Marguerite Clark made her screen debut in The Goose Girl (1915).

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Stage Number One was inadequate to handle the expanding production of the studio and a barley field to the south was annexed and Stage Number Two, an exact replica of Number one, was constructed. Soon a third stage was built, and then a fourth.

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On June 28, 1916, the Jesse L. Lasky Feature Play Company was merged with Adolph Zukor’s Famous Players organization, whose most important asset was Mary Pickford.  Zukor and Lasky combined forces and capital and purchased Paramount Pictures on July 19, 1916 and announced the formation of the $25 million Famous Players-Lasky Corporation, which included Paramount as its distributing channel. Zukor was elected president and Lasky was placed in charge of production.

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The Lasky Studios looking southeast from the corner of Selma and Vine.

The barn is on the far left of the photo.

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Within three years they acquired the entire block between Selma and Sunset on which the former barn was located. The barn was transformed into a small property room and the business offices were moved into a new administration building which extended practically the length of the entire block facing Vine Street. A new glass stage was erected 60 by 200 feet, and another glass stage of the same length. New carpenter and property construction shops were built 300 by 100 feet in size. The studio had extended its walls a full block.

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An aerial view of the Lasky lot (center)

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Further expansion continued and a vacant block on Argyle Street to the east was bought and was referred to as the “back yard,” containing fourteen garages and the street sets for outdoor filming. A new double deck paint frame was erected, eight times the size of the former paint frame, which at the time of its construction, was the largest on the Pacific Coast. Over 150 new dressing rooms were built for the stars, members of the organization and the extras. The studio also controlled the Morosco-Pallas Studios at Occidental and Council, and there, a new stage was built and the plant adjusted so that it could handle at least six companies.

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Beginning with a total staff of fifteen, just three years after The Squaw Man was completed the Lasky Company now had nearly a thousand on its weekly payroll. It had a complete printing plant on the grounds, which was used not only for printing sub-titles, but for preparing all stationary and the like. From having two automobiles, one of which was the personal property of Cecil B. DeMille, the Lasky Company now had fourteen cars, as well as three trucks. At the rear of the garages a complete machine shop was erected and all repairs were made by an expert mechanic and his crew. A concrete building was put up especially for the housing of transformers for the electricity for lights on the stages and the adjacent outdoor lot.

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A thousand-acre ranch near Burbank (now Forest Lawn-Hollywood Hills) was acquired as a site for out-door action. It was on this ranch that the studio’s growing collection of horses, cow ponies and cattle were held.

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On the studio’s twelfth anniversary, about 200 stars and well-known film executives attended and gathered in the old barn, now referred to as the “little grey home in the West,” for the celebration on December 14, 1925. Those attending included Ethel Wales, who was a casting director, secretary and, when needed, a leading lady; Mabel Van Buren, James Neill, Theodore Roberts, Dustin Farnum and others. Lasky was presented with a bronze tablet which was placed on the spot where the old barn stood.

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A month later, Famous Players-Lasky purchased the United Studios a few blocks south on Melrose Avenue and Marathon Street, reportedly for $5 million. Lasky would move their operations from the old Sunset and Vine lot to the new studio on May 1, 1926. “Although our studio in Hollywood has long been considered the best equipped plant in the country,” Lasky said, “it is not big enough to take care of the productions which we have scheduled for this coming year. The United Studios has nine stages and its 26 acres will enable us to expand our activities to take care of the production program we have in mind.”

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At the time there were no plans on what to do with the old lot, but Lasky was sentimental about the old barn and the studios beginnings, so he had it picked up and trundled over to the new location. In addition, the window frame that he used to gaze out from was removed and placed in his new private office.

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Top: An aerial view of the new Paramount lot. Note at the top is

Hollywood Cemetery and the new Cathedral Mausoleum on the far right.

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On the new Paramount lot, the old barn served as the studio library and later as the gymnasium. It became part of the studio’s western set, and a porch and railroad tracks were added outside. It was later used as part of the Bonanza television series set.  On December 26, 1956, the barn was dedicated as California Historical Landmark No. 554.

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The dedication to declare the barn a California landmark. From left:

Samuel Goldwyn, Cecil B. DeMille, Jesse Lasky, Leo Carillo.

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The barn remained on the lot until October, 1979 when Paramount gave the barn to the Hollywood Historic Trust, a cultural heritage arm of the Hollywood Chamber of Commerce. Until a decision could be made on what to do with the structure, it sat in the parking lot of Dennis Lidtke’s Palace, just north of Hollywood Boulevard on Vine Street. For the next three years it sat there becoming an eyesore to the community. Even though money was raised to restore the historic barn, there still was no permanent site to be found.

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When Jack Haley, Jr. wanted to film a television special at the Palace, he asked that the barn be moved. The Historic Trust offered to have the barn go to Universal, but preservationists knew it would become just another part of the studios tour. Eventually, Haley and Lidtke backed down on their request and the barn was allowed to stay until a site was found.

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The barn on the move.

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Meanwhile, Marion Gibbons, co-founder of Hollywood Heritage, and a board member of the Hollywood Chamber, proposed that her organization find the barn a permanent home. In May 1982, the Hollywood Historic Trust signed over the barn to Hollywood Heritage. They found a site on a grassy piece of land across from the Hollywood Bowl on Highland Avenue and signed the lease with the county on September 29 of that year. Gibbons and her volunteers finished painting the barn and getting it ready for removal from the Vine Street parking lot to the Bowl location. When completed, the barn was dedicated in December 1985 as The Hollywood Studio Museum.

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After a fire in September 1996, the museum remained closed until July 1999 when it was renamed the Hollywood Heritage Museum in the Lasky-DeMille Barn. When in Hollywood, be sure to visit the old barn where much of the early history of film took place. The museum is open from Wednesday to Sunday from noon until 4PM. For more information, visit their website at www.hollywoodheritage.org .

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100 Years of Paramount Pictures at Hollywood Heritage

Wednesday, October 24th, 2012

HOLLYWOOD EVENTS

100 years of Paramount Pictures at Hollywood Heritage

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Tickets for this event are available online with your credit card via Brown Paper Tickets.

A nominal fee will be added to the ticket price for this service.

Just go to: Paramount Pictures 100th Anniversary Celebration for more information.

Or call 1-800-838-3006 to reserve tickets over the phone.

Doors open at 7:00PM and seating is limited.

For additional information please visit: www.hollywoodheritage.org

Hollywood Heritage Museum in the Lasky-DeMille Barn

(across from the Hollywood Bowl)

2100 N. Highland Avenue, Information: 323-874-2276

FREE PARKING in “Lot D”

Admission: Hollywood Heritage Members – $5.00,

Non-Members – $15.00

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Laurel & Hardy at the Barn

Tuesday, October 9th, 2012

HOLLYWOOD EVENTS

 

 

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On Thursday, October 11th at 7:30PM the Barn will host its first Hollywood Party – Sons of the Desert event.

The first meeting is Thursday, October 11th.

Admission is $10.00 AT THE DOOR with a portion of the proceeds benefiting Hollywood Heritage Museum.

So please come join the Party!

Doors open 6:30PM and the meeting begins 7:30PM.

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A Day of Silents at Hollywood Heritage

Friday, June 1st, 2012

HOLLYWOOD EVENTS

Hollywood Heritage Logo
 
ADayofSilents 

Silent Sunday June 2012

Advance tickets via the internet are recommended through Brown Paper Tickets: A Day of Silents

 or call (800) 838-3006 to reserve over the phone. 

 

 

 A nominal service fee will be included in the price of the ticket.

 

 

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“Inside the Hollywood Fan Magazine” at Hollywood Heritage

Tuesday, January 17th, 2012

HOLLYWOOD EVENTS

Hollywood Heritage

 

Evening @ the Barn

 

 

 

On Wednesday, February 8th at 7:30 pm

       INSIDE THE HOLLYWOOD FAN MAGAZINE

by

Anthony Slide

 

Acclaimed author Anthony Slide will go “inside the Hollywood Fan Magazine” with a heavily illustrated, Power Point presentation about this fascinating and indispensable chapter in journalism and popular culture.  Hear how the fan magazines dealt with gossip and innuendo and how they handled nationwide issues such as Hollywood scandals of the 1920s, World War II and the blacklist.  At the end of the program, there will be a book signing.

 

“For anyone who equates ‘fan magazines’ with supermarket tabloids, this book should come as a revelation.  Tony Slide has one a formidable job of research to chart the birth, rise and fall of Hollywood fan magazines in the twentieth century, their relationship to the industry they covered and the readers they served.  It’s a colorful, well-told history thats full of surprises.” – Leonard Maltin

 

Advance tickets via the internet are recommended through Brown Paper Tickets: click here: Brown Paper Tickets Inside The Hollywood Fan Magazine

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Brown Paper Tickets call (800) 838-3006 to reserve over the phone. Event 217814

A nominal service fee will be added. 

 

An Evening @ the Barn will be presented in the HOLLYWOOD HERITAGE MUSEUM in the Lasky-DeMille Barn (Across from the Hollywood Bowl), 2100 N. Highland Avenue, Hollywood, CA90068.

 

Ample FREE PARKING as usual in “Lot D.”

Doors open 7:00 p.m.; program starts 7:30 p.m.

Admission: $5.00 for Hollywood Heritage Members

$10.00 for non-members

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Kevin Thomas at Hollywood Heritage

Sunday, November 6th, 2011

HOLLYWOOD EVENTS

Evening @ the Barn

Hollywood My Home Town: An evening with Kevin Thomas 

 

 

  

Wednesday, November 9, 2011

7:30 p.m.

Hollywood Heritage Museum

2100 N. Highland Avenue

(across from the Hollywood Bowl)

Hollywood, CA 90068

www.hollywoodheritage.org

 

Kevin Thomas is best known as the longest contributing film critic at the Los Angeles Times but in truth, Mr. Thomas’ life in Hollywood goes far beyond his accomplished writings. Mr. Thomas’ family was one of the first families of early Hollywood and owned property along both Hollywood Boulevard (then known as Prospect Avenue), and Cherokee and La Brea Avenues. His family was French in origin and counted among their Hollywood neighbors and friends the noted artist Paul de Longpré and Louis Blondeau, the owner of the road house which eventually became Hollywood’s first film studio.

   

This evening will provide a rare glimpse into Hollywood history since, as his career progressed, Mr. Thomas could number among his own friends not only well known luminaries like Gloria Swanson, but also Minta Durfee Arbuckle, wife of Roscoe and Gertrude Olmstead, a Valentino co-star. Film historian Robert S. Birchard will host the evening, interviewing Mr. Thomas about his family and career along with a visual presentation of early Hollywood History.

  

TICKET INFORMATION: 

Hollywood Heritage Members:  $5

Non-Members:  $10 

Doors Open:  7 p.m.

 

Although tickets may be purchased at the door, we recommend advance purchase through Brown Paper Tickets allowing patrons to buy tickets online (link is below), or over the phone at 1-800-838-3006. You can also have your tickets held for pickup the night of the event. There is a small service charge for the service, but it will guarantee seats at the events. The direct link to purchase tickets to “Hollywood My Home Town:  An Evening @ the Barn with Kevin Thomas” is:

 http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/202424

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A Day of Silents at the Barn

Tuesday, November 1st, 2011

HOLLYWOOD EVENTS

Evening @ the Barn

 

A Day of Silents at Hollywood Heritage

 

 

Saturday, November 5, 2011

2:30 p.m.

Hollywood Heritage Museum

2100 N. Highland Avenue

(across from the Hollywood Bowl)

Hollywood, CA 90068

www.hollywoodheritage.org

 

TICKET INFORMATION:

Hollywood Heritage Members:  $5 per individual film/$10 all-day pass

Non-Members:  $10 per individual film/$15 all-day pass. 

 

Doors Open:  2 p.m. 

Although tickets may be purchased at the door, we recommend advance purchase through Brown Paper Tickets allowing patrons to buy tickets online (link is below), or over the phone at 1-800-838-3006. You can also have your tickets held for pickup the night of the event. There is a small service charge for the service, but it will guarantee seats at the events. The direct link to purchase “Day of Silents” tickets is:

http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/203096

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An Evening with Jane Withers in Person

Tuesday, June 7th, 2011

HOLLYWOOD EVENTS

Evening @ the Barn

 

 

 

 

June 8, 2011 at 7:30 p.m.

Hollywood Heritage Museum

2100 N. Highland Avenue

(across from the Hollywood Bowl)

Hollywood, CA 90068

www.hollywoodheritage.org

  

Hollywood Heritage is pleased to announce an evening with beloved actress Jane Withers on Wednesday, June 8 at 7:30 pm at the Hollywood Heritage Museum.  Ms. Withers, who just celebrated her 85th birthday, will present a special retrospective on her varied career filled with film clips, anecdotes and personal remembrances. She will also be on-hand to sign autographs and take photographs with her fans.

 

Jane is best known for being one of the most popular child film stars of the 1930s and early 1940s, as well as for her portrayal of Josephine the Plumber in a series of TV commercials for Comet cleanser in the 1960s and early 1970s. Her big break came when she landed a supporting role in the 1934 Shirley Temple film Bright Eyes. Her character Joy Smythe was spoiled and obnoxious, a perfect foil to Temple’s sweet personality.

 

Through the remainder of the 1930s she starred in several movies every year, including Ginger (1935), The Farmer Takes a Wife (1935) and Little Miss Nobody (1936), usually cast as a wholesome, meddlesome young girl in films less sugary than Temple’s vehicles. Moviegoers flocked to see her films, and Withers became one of the top 10 box-office stars in 1937 and 1938. Her popularity was such that 20th Century Fox gave her big name co-stars such as the Ritz Brothers (in Pack Up Your Troubles) and Gene Autry (in Shooting High). Withers also did a stint in screenwriting in 1941: she wrote the original story filmed as Small Town Deb, under the pseudonym Jerrie Walters.

 

Withers kept working in the 1940s; she made 16 films for 2oth Century Fox, Columbia Studios and Republic Pictures. Her sweet sixteen birthday party was filmed by Paramount for the Hedda Hopper’s Hollywood series. In 1943 Withers received excellent notices for her dramatic performance in Lewis Milestone’s The North Star. She came out of retirement in 1955 to appear with James Dean, Elizabeth Taylor and Rock Hudson in the landmark film Giant, directed by George Stevens.

 

Withers gained fame again as Josephine the Plumber, a character in a long-running and popular series of television commercials for Comet cleanser, Jane continues to do voice-over work and occasional guest appearances. She is also a passionate collector and maintains many of the original costumes from her films. A selection of Jane Wither’s memorabilia will be on display in the museum lobby for this event, which promises to be a truly special evening.

 

 Admission:

Hollywood Heritage Members, $5.00; General admission at the door is $10.00

Doors open at 7:00PM and seating is limited

Free Parking in Lot D

www.hollywoodheritage.org

323-874-2276

 

Tickets for this event are also available online with your credit card via Brown Paper Tickets. A nominal fee will be added to the ticket price for this service. Just go to: https://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/176929 for more information. Or call 1-800-838-3006 to reserve tickets over the phone. 

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