Posts Tagged ‘Charlie Chaplin’

Lost Chaplin film found

Wednesday, June 9th, 2010

FILM HISTORY

 Lost Charlie Chaplin film discovered in Michigan antique sale

 

 

Still image from Charlie Chaplin’s cameo appearance in a Keystone comedy called A Thief Catcher in January 1914.

 

By Scott Eyman
Palm Beach Post

Tuesday, June 8, 2010

 

The diminutive figure emerges from the underbrush wearing a Keystone Cop uniform about four sizes too large. He screws up his courage by giving a very familiar wiggle of his butt, followed by a very familiar wriggle of his shoulders.

 

He’s wearing a little moustache that would soon become world famous, carrying only a nightstick and the possibility of greatness.

 

It’s Charlie Chaplin, making a cameo appearance in a Keystone comedy called A Thief Catcher in January 1914, just about a month after he started working at the Edendale, California, studio. It’s the 36th film he made in a frantic year’s activity before he left for more green, not to mention greener, pastures.

 

Until a few months ago, nobody knew it existed.

 

Click here to continue reading the Palm Beach Post article

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Paulette Goddard’s 100th Birthday

Thursday, June 3rd, 2010

100th BIRTHDAY

Paulette Goddard

 

 

 

AMERICAN ACTRESS

 

 

 

 Click below to watch Paulette Goddard, along with Charlie Chaplin in the ending of Modern Times (1936)

 

 

 

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Where is Claire Windsor – Update!

Thursday, May 20th, 2010

HOLLYWOOD STORIES

The disappearance of Claire Windsor – UPDATE

 

 

 

UPDATE: A reader from Claire Windsor’s birthplace has provided some additional information behind the story of Windsor’s disappearance:

 

“Greetings from Cawker City, Kansas; home town of Claire Windsor and the World’s Largest Ball of Twine!  In later years, Claire confessed that Lois Weber had hatched the plan for Claire’s disappearance to get a little publicity for her upcoming film.  Poor Chaplin was not let in on the secret and it spoiled Claire and Charlie’s personal relationship.  Little Billy Windsor, Claire’s only son, learned well from the experience and later, in an effort to get his mother’s attenetion, fabricated a story that men had come to the front door of thier house and tried to kidnap him!

 

“Claire’s 30 hour dissapearance could have turned into career ending negative publicity if the police chief’s explanation of events had been believed.  He had surmized that Claire had probably attended a ‘snow party’ and had lost her memory ! ! !  I guess even back then, drugs were a big problem in Hollywood. “

 

By Allan R. Ellenberger

 

Claire Windsor, a Kansas-born music student who came to Hollywood to seek her fortune, was pulled out of the ranks of extras by director Lois Weber, who was casting To Please One Woman (1920) and offered her a role. An immediate success, the blonde actress became one of the busiest and best-known performers in Hollywood.

 

In the summer of 1921, with only four films in release in the previous six months, Windsor was enjoying her new found success as a leading lady. On Tuesday, July 12, during filming of The Blot, also directed by Weber, Windsor took a deserved day off to go horseback riding in the Hollywood hills. Early that morning she rented a horse and headed alone through the Cahuenga Pass.

 

When Windsor did not turn up at home (1042 Third Avenue) that evening, family members called the Hollywood police, who employed an airplane to search the hills the following morning. A group of Boy Scouts who were camping in the hills also aided in the search as did many of her friends. Charlie Chaplin offered a reward leading to her location.

 

By eight o’clock on Wednesday evening, Windsor had been missing for 36 hours when Stella Dodge, who lived at the intersection of Highland and Cahuenga (now part of the Hollywood Freeway), heard moans outside her home. She investigated and found Windsor lying on the lawn underneath her window. Dodge helped Windsor into her house and called Dr. C.W. Cook and the Hollywood police. An ambulance arrived and took her to Angelus Hospital at 1925 S. Trinity Street (demolished). When found, she was wearing her riding habit, which was badly torn by thorns, and she still had on her riding gloves.

 

A thorough examination at the hospital revealed the only external injury was an abrasion on the back of her left ear and exposure and hunger due to her long isolation in the hills. Her nose was bleeding which suggested possible internal injuries. Her pulse was low and she was unable to speak until the following morning.

 

It was Dr. Cook’s opinion that Windsor was thrown from her horse, suffering an injury to the back of her head, and had wandered about in the Hollywood hills until she was found semiconscious. Chaplin and other film friends rushed to the hospital once it was learned she was found.

 

Of course, Windsor recuperated and continued a long career that spanned three decades, 50 silent films and seven talkies. Claire Windsor died at age 80 from a heart attack on October 23, 1972 at Good Samaritan Hospital. She is buried at Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Glendale.

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Kermit Gets De-bugged?

Friday, October 16th, 2009

TODAY IN HOLLYWOOD

Does Kermie have fleas?

 

Henson Studios fumigated

 (Photos: Allan R. Ellenberger)

 

By Allan R. Ellenberger

 

Oh no, does Kermit the Frog have fleas? Possibly, but just to be safe they’re fumigating his entire lily pad. As seen today in Hollywood, the old Charlie Chaplin Studios on La Brea – now home of the Jim Henson Company – was being tented for fumigation. What must Miss Piggy think?

 

Henson/Chaplin Studios

The old Charlie Chaplin Studios under a tent

 

 

Kermit the Frog

 Kermit, dressed as his predecessor Charlie Chaplin, gets ready to have his pedestal cloaked

 

 

Chaplin-Henson Studios

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Hollywood Cottage for Rent

Saturday, September 26th, 2009

 REAL ESTATE

Alledged Chaplin cottage for rent in Hollywood

 

French Village Cottages

 

Following is an update to a recent popular posting on the French village apartments that were reportedly built by Charlie Chaplin as a set for one of his films. Based on the research of a reader (see comments from the posting), most of the legends about this grouping of cottages are more legend than fact.

 

It appears that one of the cottages is for rent and the owners are once again exploiting the “legend” to find an occupant. The buildings are so quaint, I’m sure they would be a popular residence based on their own architecture and merit. The following is from the web site, Curbed Los Angeles.  I doubt that any of the new claims made in this listing are true. If it were, this would be one of the most historic buildings in Hollywood.

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“Someone once warned us to never believe any listing or broker that cites  Charlie Chaplin as a former resident. He’s the Wilt Chamberlain of LA real estate. The man got around. But in this case, it might actually be true. It seems the quaint cottages at 1330 N. Formosa Avenue, just two blocks from the former Chaplin Studios, may have been built by the little tramp. The listing claims the compound of four cottages was built in 1922 for Chaplin, “Valentino, Fairbanks, Barrymore, etc. to live in while filming at his studios on La Brea.” It also mentions that “Drew Barrymore was born here and Patrick Dempsy was a multiple year tenant.” While the listing isn’t exactly clear, it seems the unit available is one of the one-bedrooms, and it tells us “the available unit was lived in by Douglas Fairbanks Sr. & Judy Garland at least.” So it has the gay icons covered with Judy and Drew (to a lesser extent). The unit also features leaded glass, hardwood floors, a gas stove, a small gated backyard, and a false turret. We’ll take it!  Monthly rent: $1,895.” (LA Curbed)
· $1895 Charlie Chaplin Whimsical Hansel & Gretel Cottage for lease NOW[Craigslist]

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Norman Lloyd on Charlie Chaplin

Wednesday, June 3rd, 2009

FILM HISTORY

A pal doffs his hat to Charlie Chaplin

 

Classic Hollywood

  (Christina House / For The Times)

 

The Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra Silent Film Celebration is preparing to present ‘The Gold Rush.’ Chaplin friend Norman Lloyd reminisces about the star’s later years.

 

By Susan King
Los Angeles Times
June 3, 2009

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Norman Lloyd says he can remember when he first became aware of Charlie Chaplin — even if he was only 1 year old and it was more than 90 years ago.

 

The year was 1916 and, as Lloyd recalls, “there were little Charlie Chaplins that you would wind up and they would walk. I remember vividly. I was sitting in the high chair with the little tray in front of me. My parents would wind it up and it would walk to me.”

 

The 94-year-old actor, producer and director, best known for playing the kindly Dr. Daniel Auschlander on “St. Elsewhere,” would become good friends with Chaplin 30 years later. Lloyd also had a role in Chaplin’s last American production, “Limelight,” in 1952.

 

Click here to continue reading

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Hollywood Wax Figures for Sale…

Friday, April 3rd, 2009

HOLLYWOOD NEWS

Hollywood Wax Museum to auction 200 celebs

 

 

Bring Marilyn Monroe home, help preserve historic Walk of Fame

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The Associated Press
Thurs., April. 2, 2009
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LOS ANGELES – Want to permanently share your home with James Dean, Marilyn Monroe or all four Beatles?

 

The Hollywood Wax Museum is offering wax representations of these and nearly 200 other celebrities at the first auction in its 44-year history, set for May 1.

 

Fans can bid on political figures, such as George Washington and Bill Clinton, and athletes like Tiger Woods and Michael Jordan. Musicians such as Cher, Stevie Wonder and the Fab Four will be available, along with TV and film stars including Lucille Ball, Johnny Carson, Will Smith and Charlie Chaplin.

 

The auction will be administered by Profiles in History and a portion of the profits will support efforts to preserve Hollywood’s historic Walk of Fame.

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Obit: Sydney Chaplin

Friday, March 6th, 2009

OBITUARY

Sydney Chaplin dies at 82; stage actor and son of Charlie Chaplin

 

Sydney Chaplin

 

Associated Press
Sydney Chaplin stands beside the postage stamp honoring his father, Charlie Chaplin, in 1998. Sydney Chaplin won a Tony Award for starring in the late 1950s musical “Bells Are Ringing” on Broadway.
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By Valerie J. Nelson
Los Angeles Times
March 6, 2009

 

Sydney Chaplin, an actor who experienced his greatest success on stage, earning a Tony Award for starring in the late 1950s musical “Bells Are Ringing,” died Tuesday. He was 82.    (Click on ‘Continue Reading’ for more)

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(more…)

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Charlie Chaplin in World War I…

Sunday, July 13th, 2008

World War I

Charlie Chaplin

 

Douglas Fairbanks lifting up Charlie Chaplin
at a war bonds rally in New York City 

 

By Allan R. Ellenberger 

 

During the Great War, Charlie Chaplin, Mary Pickford, Douglas Fairbanks, and other film stars spoke at bond rallies that helped sell $18.7 billion in Liberty Bonds.

 

Shortly before the end of World War I, it was speculated that comedian Charlie Chaplin may be drafted as of June 1, 1918. “I’ve always been ready and am still ready to serve my country and the cause of liberty whenever it was necessary for me to go,” said Chaplin just before he left on a Liberty Bond rally in the south.

 

Chaplin appeared in four towns daily for the  Liberty Loan cause, passing up Pullman cars and travelling chair cars, resorting to autos and freights for the purpose of making towns on time. In some towns where there were no public halls, meetings were held in tobacco warehouses. At Raleigh, North Carolina, Chaplin raised $92,000 for Liberty Bonds and offered to kiss all little girls who bought bonds. While he enjoyed the osculator ceremonies, he had to discontinue the practice merely on the account of the time consumed. The age limit was not stated.

 

Below is Charlie Chaplin’s World War I registration card, dated June 5, 1917. At the time he was living at the Los Angeles Athletic Club and working for Lone Star Co. (click on image to enlarge)

  

  

 

 

 (National Archives)

 

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The Laemmle Building

Thursday, May 1st, 2008

Hollywood and Vine:

A History

 

by Allan R. Ellenberger

 

Arguably the most famous intersection in the world, Hollywood and Vine sometimes disappoints tourists who search it out. Yesterday’s fire at the intersections northwest corner made me think about its history. The intersection first became famous in the 1930s because many of Hollywood’s important radio stations were located nearby.  “Brought to you from Hollywood and Vine” was a familiar opening to many early radio broadcasts.

 

Historic 1920s office buildings are located on three of its corners. On the northeast corner is the Equitable Building (1929), a Gothic Deco commercial building, designed by Aleck Curlett. The B. H. Dyas building (1927) on the southwest corner at one time housed The Broadway-Hollywood department store. It’s famous sign still stands on its roof. And on the southeast corner is the Taft Building (1923), by architects Walker & Eisen in the Renaissance Revival style. This building once housed offices for Charlie Chaplin, Will Rogers, Hedda Hopper, Photoplay magazine and the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

 

On the northwest corner is the building devasted by yesterdays fire. At first glance it may not be mistaken for a Hollywood landmark, however, it was built in 1932-1933 by Universal founder, Carl Laemmle and bore his name (Laemmle Building) for many years. Designed by famed architect, Richard Neutra in the International Style, the building has been altered many times over the decades (beginning in 1940) and no longer retains any of its original features.

 

Below are photos from the Laemmle Buildings past:

 

Vine Street at Hollywood Blvd. in 1907. The house on the left is the
approximate location of the Laemmle Building

 

The former Laemmle Building in the 1950s

 

The Laemmle Building’s (left) incarnation as a Howard Johnson’s Restaurant

 

 

 The former Laemmle Building in the 1990s

 

Currently, the building housed the Basque Nightclub and Restaurant (6263 Hollywood Blvd.), a popular celebrity hangout. Actress Lindsay Lohan recently celebrated her 21st birthday at Basque and rap star Kanye West partied there earlier in April. Scenes from the movie Ocean’s Eleven were filmed there and the property had recently been sold as part of a renovation renaissance in Hollywood.

 

 

 

As the intersection appeared yesterday morning (Al Seib/Los Angeles Times)

 

Sadly, the 75 year-old Laemmle Building’s future is unclear. It’s not known at this time if the building is a total loss and will be demolished or if it can be saved. Once it’s fate is known, it will be reported here.

 

 (Bob Chamberlain/Los Angeles Times)

 

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