Posts Tagged ‘Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’

Oscar nominees and winners at Hollywood Forever Cemetery

Sunday, January 28th, 2018

The 90th Academy Awards ceremony, presented by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, will honor the best films of 2017 and will take place at the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood, Los Angeles, California at 5:00 p.m. PST on March 4, 2018.

To celebrate, let’s take a look at all (I hope none are hiding anywhere) Oscar nominees/winners that are interred at Hollywood Forever Cemetery.

Pierre Collings (1902-1937) was the first Academy Award nominee and winner to be interred at Hollywood Forever Cemetery. He received two Best Writing/Story nominations/wins for The Story of Louis Pasteur, a 1938 bio-pic starring fellow Hollywood Forever resident and Oscar winner, Paul Muni (1895-1967) as the famous French biologist. Technician Nathan Levinson (1888-1952) had the most nominations at 24 for Best Recording, of which he received one statue, but also was bestowed with two technical awards and one Honorary. Composer Victor Young (1900-1956) came in second at 22 nominations and one win, which sadly, was given posthumously. Cinematographer Arthur C. Miller (1895-1970) won the most at three statues. The last Oscar nominee to be interred here was screenwriter Fay Kanin (1917-2013). Ironically, the last Oscar winner to be laid to rest was Kanin’s husband–and often writing partner–screenwriter Michael Kanin (1910-1993). They shared a writing nomination for 1958’s Teacher’s Pet starring Clark Gable and Doris Day.

Image result for hollywood forever cemetery

The following are the Hollywood Forever residents that were nominated or won an Academy Award or Honorary awards, and the films they were nominated/won for. The co-founders of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences are also included.

Hollywood Forever Cemetery Academy Award Nominees and Winners. An asterisk (*) signifies the film that they won for:

1. George S. Barnes (1892-1953) Best Cinematography. 8 noms; 1 win. The Magic Flame (1927); The Devil Dancer (1927); Sadie Thompson (1928); Our Dancing Daughters (1928); *Rebecca (1940); The Spanish Main (1945); Spellbound (1945); Samson and Delilah (1949). Plot: Abbey of the Psalms, Sanctuary of Refuge, Corr G-2, Crypt 2087.

2. Anne Bauchens (1882-1967) Best Film Editing. 4 noms; 1 win. Cleopatra (1934); *Northwest Mounted Police (1940); The Greatest Show on Earth (1952); The Ten Commandments (1956). Plot: Chapel Columbarium, Lower floor, northwest wall, T-2, N-3.

3. Jack Brooks (1912-1971) Best Music, Original Song. 3 noms; 0 wins. Canyon Passage (1946); Son of Paleface (1952); The Caddy (1953). Plot: Abbey of the Psalms, Haven of Faith, T-11, N-4.

4. R. Dale Butts (1910-1990) Best Music. 1 nom; 0 wins. Flame of the Barbary Coast (1945). Plot: Section 2, Lot 69.

5. Louis Calhern (1895-1956) Best Actor. 1 nom; 0 wins. The Magnificent Yankee (1950). Plot: Abbey of the Psalms, Abbey Foyer, T-3, N-308, South wall.

6. Charles H. Christie (1880-1955) One of the 36 founders of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Plot: Garden of Legends, Section 8, Lot 178 – family marker – unmarked.

7. Pierre Collings (1902-1937) Best Writing/Story. 2 noms; 2 wins. *The Story of Louis Pasteur (1937) [2 wins]. Plot: Section 2W, Lot 696.

8. Irving Cummings (1888-1959) Best Director. 1 nom; 0 wins. In Old Arizona (1928). Plot: Section 13, Lot 305.

9. Cecil B. DeMille (1881-1959) Best Director. 1 nom; 0 wins. The Greatest Show on Earth (1952) / Best Picture. 2 noms; 1 win. *The Greatest Show on Earth (1952); The Ten Commandments (1957) / *Honorary Award (1950) / *Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award (1953). One of the 36 founders of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Plot: Garden of Legends, Section 8, Lot 50.

10. Elmer Dyer (1892-1970) Best Cinematography. 1 nom; 0 wins. Air Force (1943). Plot: Garden of Legends, Section 8, Lot 53.

11. Douglas Fairbanks (1883-1939) *Honorary Award (1940) [posthumous]. One of the 36 founders of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Plot: Large reflecting pool plot adjacent to the Cathedral Mausoleum.

12. Daniel L. Fapp (1904-1986) Best Cinematography. 7 noms; 1 win. Desire Under the Elms (1958); The Five Pennies (1959); One, Two, Three (1961); *West Side Story (1961); The Unsinkable Molly Brown (1964); Ice Station Zebra (1968); Marooned (1969). Plot: Court of the Apostles, Unit 9 (south side).

13. Charles K. Feldman (1904-1968) Best Picture. 1 nom; 0 wins. A Streetcar Named Desire (1951). Plot: Abbey of the Psalms, Sanctuary of Faith, Corr D-3, Crypt 2305.

14. Peter Finch (1916-1977) Best Actor. 2 noms; 1 win. Sunday Bloody Sunday (1971); *Network (1976). Plot: Cathedral Mausoleum, Corr A, Crypt 1224.

15. Victor Fleming (1889-1949) Best Director. 1 nom; 1 win. *Gone with the Wind (1939). Plot: Abbey of the Psalms, Sanctuary of Refuge, Crypt 2081.

16. John Foreman (1925-1992) Best Picture. 2 noms; 0 wins. Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969); Prizzi’s Honor (1985). Plot: unknown.

17. Sidney Franklin (1893-1972) Best Director. 1 nom; 0 wins. The Good Earth (1937). *Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award (1943). Plot: Garden of Legends, Section 8, Lot 1127.

18. George Froeschel (1891-1979) Best Writing, Screenplay. 2 noms; 1 win. Random Harvest (1942); *Mrs. Miniver (1942). Plot: Section 6, Lot 382.

19. Victor A. Gangelin (1899-1967) Best Art Direction. 2 noms; 1 win. Since You Went Away (1944); *West Side Story (1961). Plot: Section 9, Grave 910.

20. Judy Garland (1922-1969) Best Actress. 1 nom; 0 wins. A Star is Born (1954) / Best Supporting Actress. 1 nom; 0 wins. Judgement at Nuremburg (1961) / *Juvenile Award (1940). Plot: Abbey of the Psalms Mausoleum, Judy Garland Pavilion.

21. Tony Gaudio (1883-1951) Best Cinematography. 6 noms; 1 win. Hell’s Angels (1930); *Anthony Adverse (1936); Juarez (1939); The Letter (1940); Corvette K-225 (1943); A Song to Remember (1945). Plot: Section 5, Lot 471.

22. Janet Gaynor (1906-1984) Best Actress. 2 noms; 1 win. *[Sunrise (1927), 7th Heaven (1927), Street Angel (1928)]; A Star is Born (1937). Plot: Garden of Legends, Section 8, Lot 193.

23. Joan Hackett (1934-1983) Best Supporting Actress. 1 nom; 0 wins. Only When I Laugh (1981). Plot: Abbey of the Psalms, Sanctuary of Faith, Corr D-3, Crypt 2314.

24. Karl Hajos (1889-1950) Best Music. 2 noms; 0 wins. Summer Storm (1944); The Man Who Walked Alone (1945). Plot: Section 14, Row B, Grave 54.

25. Lenny Hayton (1908-1971) Best Music. 6 noms; 2 wins. The Harvey Girls (1946); The Pirate (1948); *On the Town (1949); Singin’ in the Rain (1952); Star! (1968); *Hello, Dolly! (1969). Plot: Plains of Abraham, Lot 153, Grave 19.

26. Milton E. Hoffman (1879-1952) One of the 36 founders of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Plot: Abbey of the Palms, Sanctuary of Refuge, Corr G-1, Crypt 321.

27. John Huston (1906-1987) Best Director. 5 noms; 1 win. *The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948); The Asphalt Jungle (1950); The African Queen (1951); Moulin Rouge (1952); Prizzi’s Honor (1985) / Best Writing. 8 noms; 1 win. Dr. Ehrlich’s Magic Bullet (1940); The Maltese Falcon (1941); Sergeant York (1941); *The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948); The Asphalt Jungle (1950); The African Queen (1951); Heaven Knows, Mr. Allison (1957); The Man Who Would Be King (1975) / Best Picture. 1 nom; 0 wins. Moulin Rouge (1952) / Best Supporting Actor. 1 nom; 0 wins. The Cardinal (1963). Plot: Garden of Legends, Section 8, Lot 6.

28. Harry Jackson (1896-1953) Best Cinematography. 1 nom; 0 wins. Mother Wore Tights (1947). Plot: Chapel Columbarium, Column D, Niche 2, Tier 2.

29. Fay Kanin (1917-2013) Best Writing. 1 nom; 0 wins. Teacher’s Pet (1958). Plot: New Beth Olam Mausoleum, 3d floor, Corr T-J-1-3.

30. Michael Kanin (1910-1993) Best Writing. 2 noms; 1 win. *Woman of the Year (1942); Teacher’s Pet (1958). Plot: New Beth Olam Mausoleum, 3rd floor, Corr T-J-1-3, Crypt 4762.

31. Bronislaw Kaper (1902-1983) Best Music-Score. 3 noms; 1 win. The Chocolate Soldier (1941); *Lili (1953); Mutiny on the Bounty (1962) / Best Original Song. 1 nom; 0 wins. Mutiny on the Bounty (1962). Plot: New Beth Olam Mausoleum, Hall of David, Corridor T-1, Niche 1513, Tier 15.

32. Frank P. Keller (1913-1977) Best Film Editing. 4 noms; 1 win. Beach Red (1967); *Bullitt (1968); The Hot Rock (1972); Jonathan Livingston Seagull (1973). Plot: Garden of Eternal Love, Section 5, east side.

33. Michael Kidd (1915-2007) *Honorary Award (1997). Plot: Section 13, Lot 847, Space 1.

34. Frederick Kohner (1905-1986) Best Writing. 1 nom; 0 wins. Mad About Music (1938). Plot: Garden of Jerusalem, Section 18.

35. Erich Wolfgang Korngold (1897-1957) Best Music. 3 noms; 1 win. *The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938); The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex (1939); The Sea Hawk (1940). Plot: Garden of Legends, Section 8, Lot 15.

36. Milton R. Krasner (1904-1988) Best Cinematography. 7 noms; 1 win. Arabian Nights (1942); All About Eve (1950); *Three Coins in the Fountain (1954); An Affair to Remember (1957); How the West Was Won (1962); Love with the Proper Stranger (1963); Fate is the Hunter (1964). Plot: New Beth Olam Mausoleum, Corr T-7-2, Gates of Heaven, Crypt 1498 (unmarked).

37. Harry Kurnitz (1908-1968) Best Writing. 1 nom; 0 wins. What Next, Corporal Hargrove? (1945). Plot: Garden of Shalom, Section 16, Row K, Grave 22.

38. Jesse L. Laskey (1880-1958) One of the 36 founders of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Plot: Abbey of the Psalms, Sanctuary of Light, Corr G-3, Crypt 2196.

39. Lester Lee (1904-1956) Best Music-Original Song. 1 nom; 0 wins. Miss Sadie Thompson (1953). Plot: Garden of Eternal Love, Section 5, Lot 838.

40. Sonya Levien (1888-1960) Best Writing. 2 noms; 1 win. State Fair (1933); *Interrupted Melody (1955). Plot: Garden of Jerusalem, Section 18, Lot 929, urn garden, far southeast corner of section.

41. Nathan Levinson (1888-1952) Best Sound-Recording/Special Effects. 24 noms; 1 win. I Am a Fugitive from a Chain Gang (1933); Gold Diggers of 1933 (1933); 42nd Street (1933); Flirtation Walk (1934); Captain Blood (1935); The Charge of the Light Brigade (1936); The Life of Emile Zola (1937); Four Daughters (1938); The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex (1939)-2 noms; The Sea Hawk (1940)-2 noms; The Sea Wolf (1941); Sergeant York (1941); Desperate Journey (1942); *Yankee Doodle Dandy (1942); Air Force (1943); This is the Army (1943); The Adventures of Mark Twain (1944); Hollywood Canteen (1944); Rhapsody in Blue (1945); A Stolen Life (1946); Johnny Belinda (1948); A Streetcar Named Desire (1951) / *Technical Achievement Award (1936) / *Honorary Award (1941) / *Technical Achievement Award (1948). Plot: Beth Olam Mausoleum, Foyer O, T-8, N-7.

42. Jeanie MacPherson (1886-1946) One of the 36 founders of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Plot: Chapel Colonnade, west Corr, South Wall, T-2.

43. Joe Mantell (1915-2010) Best Supporting Actor. 1 nom; 0 wins. Marty (1955). Plot: Section 21, Row 15, Grave 23.

44. Gertrude Ross Marks (1916-1994) Best Documentary. 1 nom; 0 wins. Walls of Fire (1971). Plot: New Beth Olam mausoleum, 3rd Floor, Corr T-J-1-3, Crypt 7763.

45. J. Peverell Marley (1901-1964) Best Cinematography. 2 noms; 0 wins. Suez (1938); Life with Father (1947). Plot: Cathedral Mausoleum, Crypt 223.

46. Hattie McDaniel (1895-1952) Best Supporting Actress. 1 nom; 1 win. *Gone with the Wind (1939). Plot: Garden of Legends, Section 8, south of lake: Cenotaph.

47. Adolphe Menjou (1890-1963) Best Actor. 1 nom; 0 wins. The Front Page (1931). Plot: Garden of Legends, Section 8, Lot 11.

48. Michel Michelet (1894-1995) Best Music. 2 noms; 0 wins. Voice in the Wind (1944); The Hairy Ape (1944). Plot: Chapel Columbarium, Second Floor, west wall, T-3, N-11.

49. Arthur C. Miller (1895-1970) Best Cinematography. 7 noms; 3 wins. The Rains Come (1939); The Blue Bird (1940); *How Green Was My Valley (1941); This Above All (1942); *The Song of Bernadette (1943); The Keys of the Kingdom (1944); *Anna and the King of Siam (1946). Plot: Abbey of the Psalms, Haven of Remembrance, T-1, N-3.

50. Thomas Miranda (1886-1962) One of the 36 founders of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Plot: Cathedral Mausoleum, Alcove of Reverence, T-15, N-5.

51. Paul Muni (1895-1967) Best Actor. 6 noms; 1 win. The Valiant (1929); I Am a Fugitive from a Chain Gang (1932); Black Fury (1935) [write-in]; *The Story of Louis Pasteur (1936); The Life of Emile Zola (1937); The Last Angry Man (1959). Plot: Plains of Abraham, Section 14, Grave 57.

52. Dudley Nichols (1895-1960) Best Writing. 4 noms; 1 win. *The Informer (1935); The Long Voyage Home (1940); Air Force (1943); The Tin Star (1957). Plot: Garden of Exodus, Section 13. Note: Nichols refused to accept his award for The Informer because of the antagonism between several industry guilds and the academy over union matters. This marked the first time an Academy Award had been declined. Academy records show that Dudley was in possession of an Oscar statuette by 1949.

53. Ingo Preminger (1911-2006) Best Picture. 1 nom; 0 wins. M*A*S*H (1970). Plot: Garden of Eternal Love, Section 5, Lot 11, Grave 1.

54. Nelson Riddle (1921-1985) Best Music. 5 noms; 1 win. Li’l Abner (1959); Can-Can (1960); Robin and the 7 Hoods (1964); Paint Your Wagon (1969); *The Great Gatsby (1974). Plot: New Beth Olam Mausoleum, Corr T-1, Columbarium, Niche 702, Tier 7.

55. Hugo Riesenfeld (1879-1939) Best Music. 1 nom, 0 wins. Make a Wish (1937). Plot: Section 17, Row R, Plot 15.

56. Mickey Rooney (1920-2014) Best Actor. 2 noms; 0 wins. Babes in Arms (1939); The Human Comedy (1943) / Best Supporting Actor. 2 noms; 0 wins. The Bold and the Brave (1956); The Black Stallion (1979) / *Juvenile Award (1939) / *Honorary Award (1983). Plot: Cathedral Lake View, Elevation 15, Couch B-1501.

57. Harold Rosson (1895-1988) Best Cinematography. 5 noms; 0 wins. The Wizard of Oz (1939); Boom Town (1940); Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo (1944); The Asphalt Jungle (1950); The Bad Seed (1956) / *Honorary Award. The Garden of Allah (1936). Plot: Garden of Legends, Section 8, Plot 43.

58. Hans J. Salter (1896-1994) Best Music. 6 noms; 0 wins. It Started with Eve (1941); The Amazing Mrs. Holliday (1943); The Merry Monahans (1944); Christmas Holiday (1944); Can’t Help Singing (1944); This Love of Ours (1945). Plot: Section 16, Lot 66B.

59. Joseph Schildkraut (1896-1964) Best Supporting Actor. 1 nom; 1 win. The Life of Emile Zola (1937). Plot: Beth Olam Mausoleum, Foyer R, West wall, Niche 212.

60. Leon Schlesinger (1884-1949) Best Short Subject-Cartoons. 6 noms; 0 wins. It’s Got Me Again (1932); A Wild Hare (1940); Rhapsody in Rivets (1941); Hiawatha’s Rabbit Hunt (1941); Pigs in a Polka (1943); Greetings Bait (1943). Plot: Beth Olam Mausoleum, Corr M-4, T-5-2, Crypt 1275.

61. Leonard Spigelgass (1908-1985) Best Writing. 1 nom; 0 wins. Mystery Street (1950). Plot: New Beth Olam Mausoleum, T-8-2, Crypt 7934.

62. George Stoll (1902-1985) Best Music. 9 noms; 1 win. Babes in Arms (1939); Strike Up the Band (1940) [2 noms]; For Me and My Gal (1942); Meet Me in St. Louis (1944); *Anchors Aweigh (1945); Love Me or Leave Me (1955); Meet Me in Las Vegas (1956); Billy Rose’s Jumbo (1962). Plot: Beth Olam, Section 18.

63. Gregg Toland (1904-1948) Best Cinematography. 6 noms; 1 win. Les Misérables (1935); Dead End (1937); Intermezzo: A Love Story (1939); *Wuthering Heights (1939); The Long Voyage Home (1940); Citizen Kane (1941). Plot: Chapel Columbarium, Lower Column H, Niche 2, Tier 4.

64. Franz Waxman (1906-1967) Best Music. 12 noms; 2 wins. The Young in Heart (1938) [2 noms]; Rebecca (1940); Suspicion (1941); Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1941); Objective, Burma! (1945); Humoresque (1946); *Sunset Blvd. (1950); *A Place in the Sun (1951); The Silver Chalice (1954); The Nun’s Story (1959); Taras Bulba (1962). Plot: Beth Olam Mausoleum, Hall of Solomon, Foyer O, T-5, N-1.

65. Clifton Webb (1889-1966) Best Supporting Actor. 2 noms; 0 wins. Laura (1944); The Razor’s Edge (1946) / Best Actor. 1 nom; 0 wins. Sitting Pretty (1948). Plot: Abbey of the Psalms, Corr G-6, Crypt 2350.

66. Jules White (1900-1985) Best Short Subject-Two Reel/Comedy. 4 noms; 0 wins. Men in Black (1934); Oh, My Nerves (1935); The Jury Goes Round ‘n’ Round (1945); Hiss and Yell (1946). Plot: Beth Olam Mausoleum, Corr M-7, Crypt 1377.

67. Carey Wilson (1889-1962) Best Writing. 1 nom; 0 wins. Mutiny on the Bounty (1935). One of the 36 founders of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Plot: Garden of Legends, Section 8, Lot 66.

68. Frank E. Woods (1860-1939) One of the 36 founders of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Plot: Columbarium, Lower floor, North wall, Tier 4, Niche 8.

69. Victor Young (1900-1956) Best Music. 22 noms; 1 win. Breaking the Ice (1938); Army Girl (1938); Man of Conquest (1939); Gulliver’s Travels (1939); Golden Boy (1939); Way Down South (1939); North West Mounted Police (1940); Dark Command (1940); Arizona (1940); Arise, My Love (1940); Hold Back the Dawn (1941); Take a Letter, Darling (1942); Silver Queen (1942); Flying Tigers (1942); For Whom the Bell Tolls (1943); Love Letters (1945) [2 noms]; The Emperor Waltz (1948); My Foolish Heart (1949); Samson and Delilah (1949); Written on the Wind (1956); *Around the World in Eighty Days (1956) [win was posthumous]. Plot: Beth Olam Mausoleum, Foyer M, Crypt 46.

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Who Named Oscar?

Sunday, February 26th, 2017

The Birth of Oscar

 

 

By Allan R. Ellenberger

  

Oscar – the name on everyone’s lips in Hollywood at this time of year. Once again on February 22, nominees will stroll down the red carpet at the Kodak Theatre to attend the 81st Annual Academy Awards. There, the phrase, “And the Oscar goes to…” will be repeated numerous times, but who originally coined the term, Oscar? Depending on who you talk to, it could be any one of several suspects, but first, some history.

 

Oscar’s parents, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences was chartered on May 4, 1927, when 36 film industry leaders met and organized the non-profit corporation dedicated to improving the artistic quality of the film medium.

 

Academy banquet at the Biltmore Hotel (LAPL)

 

A week later on May 11, a banquet was held in the Crystal Ballroom at the Biltmore Hotel where more than 300 gathered, and Douglas Fairbanks, the Academy’s first president, presided. Film industry leaders such as Louis B. Mayer, Joseph M. Schenck, Will Hays, Mary Pickford, Cecil B. DeMille, Frank Lloyd and Conrad Nagel gave their support.

 

It was Louis B. Mayer who suggested handing out awards as a way of focusing attention on films. Conrad Nagel agreed, saying, “Whatever we give, it should be a symbol of continuing progress – militant, dynamic.”

 

Inspired by the evenings proceedings, MGM art director, Cedric Gibbons began sketching a form on the tablecloth (some versions say a napkin). The figure was a brawny man standing on a reel of film gripping a crusader’s sword. Gibbons transferred the sketch to paper and it was given to sculptor George Stanley, who molded the trophy in clay. Since then very few changes have been made.

 

“They are a little distorted now because the original mold has been used so often,” Stanley said in 1957. The sculptor later designed and worked on the three well-known statues at the entrance of the Hollywood Bowl.

 

As with many actors, Oscar’s birth name would have been hard to fit on a marquee – the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences Award of Merit – more than a mouthful. So perhaps this fated him to a moniker, but just how Oscar received its unusual name is debatable. Several Hollywood notables have claimed the distinction of originating the name.

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 Margaret Herrick and Col. W. N. Selig (LAPL)

 

On their website, the Academy does not attribute the nickname to a specific person, however, one version of the story gives credit to the Academy’s executive secretary, Margaret Herrick. The story goes that in 1931, she reportedly saw the statuette, studied it carefully and exclaimed, “Why he looks like my Uncle Oscar.”

 

Sitting in an adjoining office was a newspaper correspondent who, the following day, printed the line: “Academy employees have affectionately dubbed their famous gold statuette Oscar.” (unfortunately there is no known published validation for this story)

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 Irving Thalberg, Bette Davis and Frank Capra (LAPL)

 

Two-time Oscar winner, Bette Davis believed that she created the term Oscar to describe the golden trophy.

“I am convinced that I was the first to give the statuette its name when I received one for my performance in Dangerous, made in 1935,” Davis said in 1955.

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 Bette Davis and her then-husband, Harmon Oscar Nelson, Jr.
Was the coveted award named for him?

 

“I was married at that time to Harmon O. Nelson, Jr. For a long time I did not know what his middle name was. I found out one day that it was Oscar, and it seemed a very suitable nickname for the Academy statuette.”

 

Davis, knowing there were other petitioners to the name, hinted that she would be willing to resort to fisticuffs to support her contention.

 

“Of course, that’s all so very long ago – who knows? But I’d suggest that if the other claimants become very insistent we settle the whole thing with a duel.”

 

Still other stories say that John Barrymore first coined the name – in the early days Oscar was reportedly a facetious term. Animation pioneer, Walt Disney has also been quoted as thanking the Academy for his Oscar as early as 1932. However, the person who may have the best claim for originating the name is columnist Sidney Skolsky.

 

Many references credit Skolsky for using the term “Oscar” in a 1934 column in reference to Katharine Hepburn’s Best Actress award for Morning Glory (1933). Still another names Skolsky as the anonymous reporter who supposedly overheard Margaret Herrick christen the statue in 1931; but since Skolsky had not arrived in Hollywood until 1932, that part is unlikely.

 

Skolsky claimed the term referenced an old vaudeville joke that began, “Will you have a cigar, Oscar?”

 

Though Oscars true beginning is unknown, what can be proven is the use of “Oscar” in Time magazine on March 26, 1934. If it’s not the original, it certainly is one of the first times the term was used:

 

“In the cinema industry the small gold-washed statuettes which the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Science annually awards for meritorious productions and performances are called ‘Oscars,’” the article stated.

 

This also negates Bette Davis’ claim of naming the award when she received hers in 1936 – by then the term Oscar had already been in use for two years.

 

Whatever its origin, it definitely will not to be an issue when this years nominees walk the red carpet in hopes of getting their own Oscar.

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Hollywood Events

Sunday, May 4th, 2014

HOLLYWOOD EVENTS

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HOLLYWOOD

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When visiting the Hollywood/Los Angeles area, be sure to take in many of the cultural events available to the public from the following organizations:

..

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UCLA Film and Television Archive:

Billy Wilder Theater

10899 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles

(310) 206-8013

For a listing of all events, please go to:

http://www.cinema.ucla.edu/

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Hollywood Forever Cemetery

The Masonic Lodge

Cinespia

6000 Santa Monica Blvd., Hollywood

Questions: email events@hollywoodforever.com

For more information, please go to:

http://www.hollywoodforever.com/culture

http://cinespia.org/

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Cinefamily at Silent Movie Theatre

611 N. Fairfax Avenue, Los Angeles

(323) 655-2510

For a listing of all events, please go to:

http://www.cinefamily.org/

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The Hollywood Heritage Museum in the Lasky-DeMille Barn

2100 N. Highland Avenue

(across from the Hollywood Bowl)

(323) 874-2276

For more information, please go to:

http://www.hollywoodheritage.org/

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Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences

Events and Exhibitions

Various locations

For more information, please go to:

http://www.oscars.org/events-exhibitions/

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Emil Jannings and his Oscar

Saturday, February 23rd, 2013

AMPAS HISTORY

Emil Jannings and the very first Oscar for Best Actor

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Clark Gable at the Oscars

Friday, February 22nd, 2013

AMPAS HISTORY

Clark Gable receiving his Oscar for “It Happened One Night”

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Doug and Janet at the Oscars

Thursday, February 21st, 2013

AMPAS HISTORY

Douglas Fairbanks presenting the very first Best Actress Oscar to Janet Gaynor

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Shirley and Claudette at the Oscars

Wednesday, February 20th, 2013

AMPAS HISTORY

Shirley Temple holds Claudette Colbert’s Oscar for “It Happened One Night”

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Orson Welles’ Oscar is for sale

Saturday, December 17th, 2011

ACADEMY NEWS

Orson Welles’ “Citizen Kane” Oscar returns to auction

 

 (Courtesy: Nate D. Sanders)

 

 

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) – Orson Welles’ Oscar for writing “Citizen Kane” — regarded as one of the best films ever made — is going up for auction again later this month in a hot market for Hollywood memorabilia.

 

Los Angeles auction house Nate D. Sanders said on Monday it was selling the best screenplay Academy Award statuette won by Welles in 1942.

 

Click here to continue reading…

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AMPAS to build amphitheater in Hollywood

Saturday, December 17th, 2011

ACADEMY NEWS

Oscars academy to build outdoor theater in Hollywood

 

 

 A photo illustration shows the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ plan for an outdoor theater screening classic films. (AMPAS / December 16, 2011)

 

 

The Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences will build an amphitheater and event space at Vine and Fountain, where it had planned to build a movie museum.

 

By Nicole Sperling
Los Angeles Times
December 17, 2011

 

The Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences will build an amphitheater and event space in Hollywood on a parcel of land that had been the planned site for a movie museum. The 17,000-square-foot outdoor space is designed to function as a venue for showing classic films and is expected to open in May, according to academy President Tom Sherak.

 

“It seems like the right thing for both Los Angeles and the academy,” Sherak said. “Anyone can set up an outdoor theater but nobody can show what we can show — either from our archives or from our members. If it works and it’s a safe place to go, that’s a good thing for L.A.”

 

Click here to continue reading…

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An interview with Margaret O’Brien — PART TWO

Monday, January 17th, 2011

INTERVIEWS

Margaret O’Brien: the MGM Years —

PART TWO

 

  

By Allan R. Ellenberger 

 

Continued…

 

AE: You worked with the wonderful Charles Laughton in “The Canterville Ghost” (1944). Is it true that he was worried that you would upstage him in your scenes together?

Margaret O’Brien: (laughs) I thought, oh my goodness, I’m going to be afraid to work with this great English actor. And I also thought that he probably didn’t like children—but he was wonderful, just wonderful. I liked him because he treated me like an adult actress. We would fight for each other’s scenes, and we’d get mad at each other and then we’d make up. Then he would cry to Robert Young and say, “I think she’s stealing my scenes, she must be a changeling.” Then Robert would say, “Look, I’m just a soldier, and you’re a ghost and come in on all these wires, so look what you have working for you. So, don’t worry about it.” But he was very insecure. And he really worried that he wouldn’t be good in the scene. But, of course, he was always marvelous. He was one of my favorite actors, and we became real good friends.

 

AE: Now, let’s discuss what is arguably your most famous film, the classic, “Meet Me In St. Louis.” (1944).

Margaret O’Brien: Well, Meet Me In St. Louis was one of my favorites because I got to play a bratty part. I was a pretty nice little girl and didn’t get into much trouble as a kid. I was quiet. But as Tooty I was able to say and do all the things that maybe I would not have done myself. And I loved the Halloween sequence because Halloween was always my favorite time of the year. That sequence was shot at night, and I loved that because it made me feel real grown. I didn’t have to be at the studio until four in the afternoon, and I don’t think I had to go to school so I was able to play with all the kids.

 

AE: What are your memories of Judy Garland?

Margaret O’Brien: Judy was wonderful to work with. She was like a big sister. I remember that just before filming started, I lost my two front teeth, and the dentist put in false ones. During the cake walk scene I was singing, and those two teeth popped out and flew across the room and hit Vincente Minnelli in the head. Well, everyone began to roar with laughter, and it embarrassed me, and I began to cry. Judy took me in her arms and comforted me, explaining that they were not laughing at me. I appreciated that. I think that was a happy time for Judy. It was during that film that she fell in love with Vincente Minnelli.

 

AE: How was Vincente Minnelli to work for?

Margaret O’Brien: Vincente Minnelli was very meticulous about everything including the sets. He made sure everything was authentic. I loved those sets. I used to go out and walk up and down that street and pretend I was in Victorian times. I even tried to steal the doorknobs off the doors—now I wish I had. Years later I looked for a similar street and have always wanted a house like the one in Meet Me In St. Louis.

 

AE: In interviews and in his autobiography, Vincente Minnelli claims that in order to get you to cry during the snowman scene, he had to tell you that your dog was going to be killed. Is that true?

Margaret O’Brien: A lot of people have asked how they got me to cry, and it wasn’t because my dog died. Vincente Minnelli told that story, but it’s not true—my mother would never have allowed that. June Allyson and I were known as the “Town Criers” at MGM, so we had a little competition going on. So, if I had a hard time crying, all my mother had to do was say that she was sure June could do it and maybe she would have the makeup man come over and spray on the “false tears,” Well, that upset me, and then I would cry.

 

AE: What about Mary Astor? What was she like?

Margaret O’Brien: Mary Astor was very motherly. I was always afraid that I’d do something wrong. In fact, there was one scene—dinner scene—where I rearranged all the silverware and plates between takes, and nobody knew. Then we came back to shoot it, and someone realized it was all different, and they had to shoot it all over again. So, Mary got a little bit annoyed and said, “Margaret, you can’t do that. No more changing of the silverware.” (laughs) Mary still remembered that years later when I visited her at the Motion Picture Country Home.

 

 

 

 

AE: Any more memories of “Meet Me In St. Louis?”

Margaret O’Brien: Well, I almost didn’t do Meet Me In St. Louis because my mother wanted a bigger salary. So, when Mr. Mayer didn’t comply, she took me to New York, and they replaced me with another little girl. But eventually Mayer relented and agreed to my mother’s demands, so we came back. However, the family of the little girl who replaced me was so upset over her being taken off the film that later her father somehow got on the set of Unfinished Dance and tried to drop a light on me. Ironically, that same girl was also up for Journey For Margaret, so this was just another disappointment.

 

AE: Your performance in “Meet Me In St. Louis” earned you a special Academy Award for Outstanding Child Actress of 1944. What was that like?

Margaret O’Brien: Well, the night of the ceremonies, my mother wrote a special speech for me to say. So, when Mervyn LeRoy presented me with the Oscar, all I could say was, “I don’t know what to say. Thank you so much.” Well, my mother wasn’t very pleased. The Oscar they gave me was a miniature one, and I remember Bob Hope (the emcee that evening) called it an Oscarette, which made me laugh.

 

 

 

 

AE: Several years later, that Oscar was stolen from your house. How did that happen?

Margaret O’Brien: Well, at our home in Beverly Hills, we had a maid whose duties included polishing some of the awards I had received, including the Oscar. One day she asked my mother if she could take the Oscar and several awards home with her to polish, and my mother agreed. After three days, the maid failed to return, and Mother called her and fired her and asked that she return the awards. Shortly after my mother became sick and died not much later. Well, I was too devastated at the time to think about the awards, but I did call the maid several months later, but her phone had been disconnected, and she had moved. I considered it gone forever. Then, several years later, the Academy graciously replaced the award, but it wasn’t the same.

 

AE: Then, in 1995, after 37 years, it miraculously appeared at a flea market. Is that right?

Margaret O’Brien: Yes. Two men bought it at a Pasadena flea market and put it up for sale at an auction. However, when they were told that it was real and that it had been stolen, they very graciously returned the Oscar to me. I was very grateful.

 

AE: You worked with movie tough guy Edward G. Robinson in “Our Vines Have Tender Grapes” (1945). What was he like?

Margaret O’Brien: I became very close with him. It was fun pretending I was his daughter and the little girl from the farm. I had seen many of his films, but I didn’t think of him as the gangster type at all. I had difficulty connecting the gangster to the loving father. He was playing such a different role, and he played it so well. He said that film was one of his favorites.

 

AE: James Craig was also in this film. Did you still have a crush on him by then?

Margaret O’Brien: Not as much. It had wandered away. (laughs)

 

AE: Did you get crushes on many of your costars?

Margaret O’Brien: No. I would feel close to many of them, like Jimmy Durante was like my uncle, and Lionel Barrymore was like a grandfather. But not crushes. And Robert Young—I felt he was nice and very handsome, but I didn’t have a crush on him—only James Craig and Bobby Blake. Oh, and I later had a crush on Dean Stockwell. But the actor who I had the biggest crush on was not at MGM and who I never worked with—Burt Lancaster.

 

AE: Did you ever meet Mr. Lancaster?

Margaret O’Brien: Yes, because we had the same dentist. That’s how my mother got me to go to the dentist and have my teeth straightened. And I used to have to go all the time because when I did a movie I had to have the braces taken off, and then between movies I had them put back on again. So, my mother had the dentist arrange a meeting with Burt Lancaster, and I got his autograph.

 

AE: How much time did you have between films before you would make another one?

Margaret O’Brien: Maybe two or three months, but you had to be at the studio all the time. I had to go to the studio every day for school, and then I’d have to do publicity shots. So you were always there except on weekends.

 

AE: Dalton Trumbo wrote the screenplay for “Our Vines Have Tender Grapes,” which was his last film before being labeled a Communist and being sentenced to jail for refusing to testify before the House Un-American Committee. What are your remembrances of him?

Margaret O’Brien: My family was very close to Dalton Trumbo. He would come by the set quite often. And later, they wouldn’t show the film because of the supposed communist overtones—which wasn’t true at all. So, we felt badly when they had to leave to go to Mexico, I believe. In fact, we saw them off when they left town on the train. Everyone was waving a flag. People warned my mother not to go down to the train station because it would ruin her and me, but we went anyway because they were our friends. That was a terrible time during the McCarthy era. So many of those writers were not communists.

 

AE: You made a western at MGM called “Bad Bascomb” with Wallace Beery and Marjorie Main. The studio actually sent you on location to Jackson Hole, Wyoming for this film, which must have been fun.

Margaret O’Brien: Yes, and I was made an Indian princess and stayed with an Indian family for several days. And I fell in love with an Indian boy. We had the Apache tribe there with us, and when they made me a princess it just thrilled me because I did admire them very much. I thought they were very strong and wonderful riders. Jackson Hole was a wild and rugged town then. It was out in the wilderness. Wallace Beery had a cabin up there, and bears would come up on the front porch.

 

 

 

 

AE: What about Wallace Beery? Are all the stories about him and child actors true?

Margaret O’Brien: Wallace Beery was very hard to work with. Thank goodness for the crew because he did not like children. They had to put blocks between us so he wouldn’t pinch me. So, I would turn my face away from the camera.

 

AE: Why would he pinch you?

Margaret O’Brien: He’d pinch me so I’d say the line the way he wanted.

 

AE: Didn’t the director or your mother see him do it?

Margaret O’Brien: Yes, that’s why they got after him and decided to put the blocks between us. Then, when he couldn’t pinch me anymore, he would steal my hot lunch on the set. It was the same with his adopted daughter, who was working as an extra—she broke her glasses one day, and he made her work extra hours to pay for them.

 

AE: This was your second film with Marjorie Main. Tell me about her.

Margaret O’Brien: Marjorie was very eccentric She was scared to death while we were there, especially of all the mosquitoes and bugs. So, she would wear toilet paper on her arms. And then we would go into this log cabin to eat, and she’d set a place for her dead husband and talk to him at the table. She was fun—she was real nice. And I loved riding on the covered wagon with her.

 

AE: Were there any other interesting things that happened on location?

Margaret O’Brien: Sylvan S. Simon directed the picture, and one day I got into a fist fight with his daughter who was working as an extra. That was the only fist fight I ever got into as a kid. We got into some disagreement—I forget what it was about—and our parents pulled us away. I got a spanking, and she got sent to a boarding school when she got home (laughs). Then years later we became real good friends, and she turned out to be one of the sweetest girls I ever met.

 

 On Wednesday in PART THREE Margaret talks about Louis B. Mayer, Elizabeth Taylor and Dean Stockwell, among others.

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