Sid Melton Obituary

OBITUARY 

Sid Melton; character actor in dozens of TV, film projects

 

 

 

Sid Melton, 94, a character actor perhaps best known for his roles in the hit television shows “Green Acres” and “The Danny Thomas Show,” died of pneumonia Wednesday at Providence St. Joseph Medical Center in Burbank, his family said.

 

During a career that spanned nearly 60 years, Melton appeared in about 140 television and film projects. They included two 1951 movies, “Lost Continent” with Cesar Romero and the Samuel Fuller-directed “The Steel Helmet,” and 1972’s “Lady Sings the Blues” with Diana Ross.

 

On the 1950s TV show “Captain Midnight,” Melton co-starred as the hero’s sidekick, Ichabod Mudd. Decades later, he recalled that fans still greeted him with the character’s signature line: “Mudd with two Ds.”

 

A regular on “The Danny Thomas Show” from 1959 to 1971, Melton played club owner Uncle Charley Halper. Melton also had a recurring role in the late 1960s on the sitcom “Green Acres” as Alf Monroe, half of an inept brother-sister carpenter team. He also appeared in flashback sequences as the husband of Estelle Getty’s widowed character on “The Golden Girls” sitcom, which originally aired from 1985 to 1992.

 

He was born Sidney Meltzer on May 22, 1917, in New York City. His father, Isidor Meltzer, was a comedian in Yiddish theater.

 

On the stage, Melton debuted in 1939 in a touring production of “See My Lawyer” and appeared in 1947 on Broadway in “The Magic Touch,” using his stage name, Sid Melton.

 

Melton broke in to Hollywood with the help of his older brother, Lewis Meltzer, a screenwriter who adapted “Golden Boy” and “Man With the Golden Arm.” After interviewing at MGM, the actor soon had a small part in the 1941 film “Shadow of a Thin Man” with William Powell and Myrna Loy.

LOS ANGELES TIMES

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3 Responses to “Sid Melton Obituary”

  1. landman says:

    We will miss you Sid! I always enjoyed when you were on a show. You had the rare quality of a great character actor. Loved you on Green Acres!!!!!!!! God Bless you Sid and the Melton Family.

  2. Paula Horowitz says:

    He was one of my favorite characters, and when I moved to Sherman Oaks he became a friend. My husband and his dog were instant companions, but best of all when I said I wrote a screenplay he might be interested in, he actually not only read it, but wanted to play a CONTENTIOUS character-VP of the condo in my play titiled THE CONDO COMMANDOS. He was a wonderful actor and a terrific character, a consumate professional. I watched him on DANNY THOMAS SHOW, and then GREEN ACRES, and enjoyed him as Salvatore, Estelle Getty’s dead husband on THE GOLDEN GIRLS, and was honored that he applauded my talent. He told me Hollywood was a strange place and when I was told my writing was good but I should make my screenplay appeal to today’s populus- genre and lingo- changing the hero to a kid. He said, “Paula, you’re a terrific writer, don’t compromise your virtues.” I never forgot that advice. I noticed over the years with both son and daugher comedy writer/exec. producers for major shows there values and work has changed to accommodate today’s society. As they age, their views, too have changed but we must adhere to society.

  3. Paula Horowitz says:

    He was one of my favorite characters, and when I moved to Sherman Oaks he became a friend. My husband and his dog were instant companions, but best of all when I said I wrote a screenplay he might be interested in, he actually not only read it, but wanted to play a CONTENTIOUS character-VP of the condo in my play titiled THE CONDO COMMANDOS. He was a wonderful actor, a consumate professional. I watched him on DANNY THOMAS SHOW, GREEN ACRES, and enjoyed Salvatore, Estelle Getty’s dead husband on THE GOLDEN GIRLS, I was honored he applauded my talent but when was told I should make my screenplay appeal to today’s populus,
    changing the hero to a kid, he said, “Paula, you’re a terrific writer, don’t compromise your virtues.” I never forgot that advice. Both my son and daugher, comedy writers/exec. producers for major shows values and work has changed to accommodate today’s society.

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