Golden Globe Winners…

AWARDS

‘Slumdog Millionaire’ is the top dog

 

Slumdog-Millionaire

Danny Boyle, left, who won for directing, with stars Freida Pinto and Dev Patel.

 

By John Horn
January 12, 2009

 

In a ceremony alternatively as solemn and celebratory as the movie that won a leading four prizes — the rags-to-riches drama “Slumdog Millionaire” — Sunday night’s Golden Globe awards helped focus the Oscar race as it honored the late Heath Ledger for his performance in ” The Dark Knight.”

 

By winning trophies for best dramatic picture, director, screenplay and score, “Slumdog Millionaire” cemented its place as the awards season’s most beloved underdog: After losing its American distributor soon after it completed filming early last year, the modestly budgeted story of an unlikely Indian game show contestant now has become not only a powerful Academy Award contender but also a minor box-office hit.

 

“We really weren’t expecting to be here in America at all at one time so it’s just amazing to be standing here,” “Slumdog Millionaire” screenwriter Simon Beaufoy said in accepting his honor from the Hollywood Foreign Press Assn. A few months after Warner Bros. closed “Slumdog Millionaire” distributor Warner Independent Pictures, Fox Searchlight took over the $14-million film’s release, with Warners sharing costs and revenue.

 

If “Slumdog Millionaire” provided the most joyous moments at the 66th annual awards show, Ledger’s posthumous win for supporting actor offered its most poignant.

 

Ledger died last January from an overdose of prescription medications, before “The Dark Knight” was released and became the second-highest grossing movie in Hollywood, trailing only “Titanic.” “The Dark Knight” was the actor’s last completed film role.

 

“I for one will start to be able to look less at the gap in the future and the incredible place Heath made for himself with his talent and with his dedication,” Chris Nolan, the film’s director and co-writer, said in accepting Ledger’s award for his haunting performance as the Joker.

 

Ledger’s win was not unexpected, but in one of the more surprising picks by the 85 movie journalists who make up the HFPA, Mickey Rourke was named best dramatic actor for his role as an over-the-hill grappler in “The Wrestler.”

 

“It’s been a very long road back for me,” said a humbled Rourke, a veteran actor whose admittedly wild off-screen behavior tarnished his reputation and nearly cost him the lead role in “The Wrestler.” Rourke was initially dropped from the film when the producers couldn’t raise money to make the movie with him in the lead, and he was recast only after his replacement, Nicolas Cage, and director Darren Aronofsky parted ways on the movie. The actor even thanked his dogs for sticking with him when others did not.

 

More of an extended, freewheeling and alcohol-soaked dinner party than most awards show, Sunday night’s ceremony may have reached new highs (or lows) for bawdy banter.

 

Rourke’s acceptance speech was peppered with mild profanities, Aronofsky made a joking (but nevertheless obscene) gesture toward Rourke, and “Slumdog Millionaire” producer Christian Colson uttered a four-letter expletive when the broadcast’s producers cued music in the middle of his best drama acceptance speech. The remarks and gesture could spark complaints to the Federal Communications Commission; publicists from NBC did not immediately respond to e-mails seeking comment.

 

When winners weren’t talking like gangster rappers, a few appeared surprised and flattered, including the English actress Kate Winslet, who won for dramatic actress (as an unhappy suburban housewife in “Revolutionary Road”) and supporting actress for “The Reader” (in which she played a German troller worker with a horrendous secret.)

 

“I was so shocked to win one. Honestly, I can’t believe it,” Winslet said backstage after collecting her second trophy. “To have been here so many times and to have not won so many times. To win twice in one night . . . ,” said the actress, a previous Golden Globe nominee for “Little Children.”

 

Because the HFPA is composed of journalists working for foreign publications, it was not entirely unanticipated that only one of the six acting winners was American (Rourke being the exception).

 

“Happy Go Lucky’s” Sally Hawkins, who was named top actress in a musical or comedy, is English, while “In Bruges’ “ Colin Farrell, the selection for best actor in a musical or comedy, is Irish. Winslet is British and Ledger was born in Australia.

 

In the other film awards, Woody Allen’s “Vicky Cristina Barcelona” collected the award for best comedy or musical, “Waltz With Bashir” was named top foreign language film, “Wall-E” took the animation prize, and Bruce Springsteen’s ballad for “The Wrestler” — a song that Rourke personally asked the rocker to compose — was honored as best original song.

 

The Golden Globes are hardly a sure-fire predictor of Academy Awards nominations or wins. Last year, the ceremony’s top drama, ” Atonement,” didn’t win best picture ( “No Country for Old Men” did), and its choice for comedy or musical — “Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street” — wasn’t even nominated for the best picture Oscar.

 

But few would deny that “Slumdog Millionaire” is now a favorite for winning multiple Oscars. And in some ways, this year’s Golden Globe show dramatized that, even in a recession, Hollywood is back to its usual business of displays of wealth and back-slapping, with any worries about employment far from the forefront.

 

Last year’s 100-day Writers Guild of America strike turned 2008 Globes into a surreal news conference that was both free of stars (who refused to cross WGA pickets) and television viewers.

 

But striking writers — or the prospect of a possible 2009 walkout by the Screen Actors Guild — were apparently not on most people’s minds. In fact, the night’s first television winner, Tom Wilkinson, couldn’t remember the name of historian David McCullough, the author of ” John Adams,” the source material for the HBO mini-series for which Wilkinson won a supporting actor award.

 

john.horn@latimes.com

 

For a complete list of nominations and winners for the 66th Golden Globes, please click on ‘Continue Reading’

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2009 Golden Globes scorecard

 

A complete list of winners for the 66th annual Golden Globe Awards.

 

MOTION PICTURE CATEGORIES

BEST MOTION PICTURE, DRAMA

“The Curious Case of Benjamin Button”
“Frost/Nixon”
“The Reader”
“Revolutionary Road”
“Slumdog Millionaire” (Winner)

BEST MOTION PICTURE, MUSICAL OR COMEDY

“Burn After Reading”
“Happy-Go-Lucky”
“In Bruges”
“Mamma Mia!”
“Vicky Cristina Barcelona” (Winner)

FOREIGN LANGUAGE PICTURE

“The Baader Meinhof Complex”
“Everlasting Moments”
“Gomorrah”
“I’ve Loved You So Long”
“Waltz With Bashir” (Winner)

BEST DIRECTOR

Danny Boyle, “Slumdog Millionaire”(Winner)
Stephen Daldry, “The Reader”
David Fincher, “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button”
Ron Howard, “Frost/Nixon”
Sam Mendes, “Revolutionary Road”

 

BEST DRAMATIC ACTOR

Leonardo DiCaprio, “Revolutionary Road”
Frank Langella, “Frost/Nixon”
Sean Penn, “Milk”
Brad Pitt, “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button”
Mickey Rourke, “The Wrestler” (Winner)

BEST DRAMATIC ACTRESS

Anne Hathaway, “Rachel Getting Married”
Angelina Jolie, “Changeling”
Meryl Streep, “Doubt”
Kristin Scott Thomas, “I’ve Loved You So Long”
Kate Winslet, “Revolutionary Road” (Winner)

BEST ACTOR, COMEDY OR MUSICAL

Javier Bardem, “Vicky Cristina Barcelona”
Colin Farrell, “In Bruges” (Winner)
James Franco, “Pineapple Express”
Brendan Gleeson, “In Bruges”
Dustin Hoffman, “Last Chance Harvey”

 

BEST ACTRESS, COMEDY OR MUSICAL

Rebecca Hall, “Vicky Cristina Barcelona”
Sally Hawkins, “Happy-Go-Lucky” (Winner)
Frances McDormand, “Burn After Reading”
Meryl Streep, “Mamma Mia!”
Emma Thompson, “Last Chance Harvey”

 

SUPPORTING ACTOR

Tom Cruise, “Tropic Thunder”
Robert Downey Jr., “Tropic Thunder”
Ralph Fiennes, “The Duchess”
Philip Seymour Hoffman, “Doubt”
Heath Ledger, “The Dark Knight” (Winner)

SUPPORTING ACTRESS

Amy Adams, “Doubt”
Penelope Cruz, “Vicky Cristina Barcelona”
Viola Davis, “Doubt”
Marisa Tomei, “The Wrestler”
Kate Winslet, “The Reader” (Winner)

ANIMATED FILM

“Bolt”
“Kung Fu Panda”
“Wall-E” (Winner)

SCREENPLAY

Simon Beaufoy, “Slumdog Millionaire” (Winner)
David Hare, “The Reader”
Peter Morgan, “Frost/Nixon”
Eric Roth, “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button”
John Patrick Shanley, “Doubt”

 

ORIGINAL SCORE

Alexandre Desplat, “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button”
Clint Eastwood, “Changeling”
James Newton Howard, “Defiance”
Hans Zimmer, “Frost/Nixon”
A.R. Rahman, “Slumdog Millionaire” (Winner)

SONG

“Down to Earth” (performed by Peter Gabriel, written by Peter Gabriel and Thomas Newman), “Wall-E”
“Gran Torino” (performed by Clint Eastwood, Jamie Cullum, Kyle Eastwood, Michael Stevens, lyrics by: Kyle Eastwood, Michael Stevens), “Gran Torino”
“I Thought I Lost You” (performed by Miley Cyrus and John Travolta, written by Miley Cyrus and Jeffrey Steele), “Bolt”
“Once in a Lifetime” (performed by Beyoncé, written by Beyoncé Knowles, Amanda Ghost, Scott McFarnon, Ian Dench, James Dring, Jody Street), “Cadillac Records”
“The Wrestler” (performed by Bruce Springsteen, written by Bruce Springsteen), “The Wrestler” (Winner)

TELEVISION CATEGORIES

DRAMATIC TV SERIES

“Dexter”
“House M.D.”
“In Treatment”
“Mad Men” (Winner)
“True Blood”

 

BEST ACTOR, TV DRAMA

Gabriel Byrne, “In Treatment” (Winner)
Michael C. Hall, “Dexter”
Jon Hamm, “Mad Men”
Hugh Laurie, “House M.D.”
Jonathan Rhys Meyers, “The Tudors”

 

BEST ACTRESS, TV DRAMA

Sally Field, “Brothers & Sisters”
Mariska Hargitay, “Law & Order: SVU”
January Jones, “Mad Men”
Anna Paquin, “True Blood” (Winner)
Kyra Sedgwick, “The Closer”

 

TV SERIES, MUSICAL OR COMEDY

“Californication”
“Entourage”
“The Office”
“30 Rock” (Winner)
“Weeds”

 

BEST ACTOR, TV MUSICAL OR COMEDY

Alec Baldwin, “30 Rock” (Winner)
Steve Carell, “The Office”
Kevin Connolly, “Entourage”
David Duchovny, “Californication”
Tony Shalhoub, “Monk”

 

BEST ACTRESS, TV MUSICAL OR COMEDY

Christina Applegate, “Samantha Who?”
America Ferrera, “Ugly Betty”
Tina Fey, “30 Rock” (Winner)
Debra Messing, “The Starter Wife”
Mary-Louise Parker, “Weeds”

 

BEST MINISERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

“Cranford”
“Bernard & Doris”
“John Adams” (Winner)
“A Raisin in the Sun”
“Recount”

 

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MINISERIES OR A MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

Judi Dench, “Cranford”
Laura Linney, “John Adams” (Winner)
Catherine Keener, “An American Crime”
Shirley MacLaine, “Coco Chanel”
Susan Sarandon, “Bernard & Doris”

 

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MINISERIES OR A MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

Ralph Fiennes, “Bernard and Doris”
Paul Giammatti, “John Adams” (Winner)
Kevin Spacey, “Recount”
Kiefer Sutherland, “24: Redemption”
Tom Wilkinson, “Recount”

 

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A SERIES, MINISERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

Eileen Atkins, “Cranford”
Laura Dern, “Recount” (Winner)
Melissa George, “In Treatment”
Rachel Griffiths, “Brothers & Sisters”
Dianne Wiest, “In Treatment”

 

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A SERIES, MINISERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

Neil Patrick Harris, “How I Met Your Mother”
Denis Leary, “Recount”
Jeremy Piven, “Entourage”
Blair Underwood, “In Treatment”
Tom Wilkinson, “John Adams” (Winner)

CECIL B. DEMILLE LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD<
Steven Spielberg

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