Archive for the ‘Hollywood Architecture’ Category

William Andrews Clark Jr. Mausoleum at Hollywood Forever

Friday, June 4th, 2010
By Allan R. Ellenberger

Visitors to Hollywood Forever Cemetery invariably ask who is interred in the huge mausoleum in the center of the lake. The answer is William Andrews Clark, Jr., the second son of millionaire copper-king and Montana Senator, William A. Clark, Sr. (1839-1925).

Clark, a philanthropist, was founder of the Los Angeles Philharmonic (1919) and a collector of rare books. At his death, he left his library of rare books and manuscripts to the regents of UCLA. Today, the William Andrews Clark Memorial Library specializes in English literature and history from 1641 to 1800, materials related to Oscar Wilde and his associates, and fine printing.

The Clark family mausoleum is built on an island approached by a large bridge fashioned of 40-foot granite slabs. The artificial lake, island and bridge, which covers 50,000 square feet, were constructed in 1909 at a cost of $10,000. At the time it was said to be modeled after “one of the large cemeteries of the East.”

In January 1920, Clark bought the island and within a few weeks, contractors began work on the foundation of the mausoleum which is made of reinforced concrete. Clark contracted the Georgia Marble Company (Tate, Georgia) for $125,000 worth of white Georgia crystaline marble, where it was quarried but was cut here in Los Angeles.

The mausoleum, which was designed by architect Robert D. Farquhar, is in the Ionic style. The pediment is all in one piece. The bronze door was cast from a model design and made by an eastern sculptor.

The interior of the mausoleum is finished with reddish marble and the sarcophagi, of which there are seven, are in like material. The inside dome is finished with a design worked out in mosaic of pigeon blue and old gold. A similar mosaic is laid on the floor. The four interior stained glass windows were made by Lamm & Co. of New York. On the walls are Biblical scenes done in mosaic which 18 Italian artists labored on for 14 months.

The mausoleum was completed in 1921 at a cost of more than $500,000, which includes the island site, the bridge and the lake which had palely beautiful lotus blossoms, hyacinths and lilies from far-away lands.

When the mausoleum was completed, Clark transferred the body of his first wife, Mabel Foster Clark (1880-1903) to it from a vault in Butte, Montana, and also the body of his second wife, Alice McManus Clark (1884-1918) which was then resting in the family mausoleum of his uncle, J. Ross Clark, at Hollywood Cemetery.

There are seven sarcophagi in the mausoleum, three on each side, and one at the head where Clark is interred. Besides his two wives, also interred there is his only son, William A. Clark III (1902-1932), who died in an airplane crash. They all preceded him in death.

William Andrews Clark, Jr. died of heart disease at his summer home in Salmon Lake, Montana on June 14, 1934.

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Clark’s father, Senator William Andrews Clark, Sr., is interred in his own grand mausoleum (above) at the Woodlawn Cemetery in The Bronx, New York City.

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Hollywood Wilshire YMCA

Saturday, October 24th, 2009

HOLLYWOOD ARCHITECTURE

Hollywood Branch YMCA

 

Hollywood YMCA

 

 Hollywood Wilshire YMCA

1553 N. Schrader Blvd.

Hollywood, California

 

 

YMCA groundbreaking - LAPL

 Groundbreaking for the Hollywood Branch YMCA May 15, 1923 (LAPL)

 

 

By Allan R. Ellenberger

 

 The Young Mens Christian  Association in Hollywood broke ground at 1 pm on May 15, 1923 for the first unit of the Hollywood Branch YMCA building at Selma and Hudson Streets (now Schrader Blvd.).

 

Chairman W. J. Palmer assigned the honor of turning the first shovelful of earth to Dr. William H. Snyder, principal of Hollywood High School, and member of the committee of management of the Hollywood YMCA. He was followed by A. J. Walllace, ex-Lieutenant-Governor: W. S. Hunkins, chairman of the building committee, and F. E. Eckhart, president of the Los Angeles YMCA.

 

Rev. Samuel J. Skevington of Hollywood Baptist Church, expressed sentiments of solicitation and thankfulness in the invocation. He was followed by General Secretary Harry F. Henderson, who voice the hope that this spot would mark the rallying place for the boyhood of Hollywood, “in whose hands is the future of this community.”

 

The first phase of the building was officially dedicated on February 19, 1923 at 8 pm. F. E. Eckhart presided and Willsie Martin, pastor of the First Methodist Church of Hollywood, delivered the address and the Hollywood High School Orchestra provided the music.

 

 

YMCA 1930s

 Hollywood YMCA (1928 addition) in the early 1930s (LAPL)

 

 

 Hollywood YMCA - today

 Hollywood Wilshire YMCA as it looks today

 

 

Hollywood YMCA entrance

 

 

 

Hollywood YMCA

 

 

 

Hollywood YMCA-balcony

 

 

Hollywood YMCA 1928 cornerstone

The cornerstone for the 1928 addition of the Hollywood YMCA

 

 

Hollywood YMCA

 

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Granville Towers…

Sunday, February 1st, 2009

HOLLYWOOD ARCHITECTURE

Grand view in grand style

 

Granville-Towers

 

Contemporary meets Old Hollywood in Granville Towers’ opulent penthouse

 

By Dinah Eng
Los Angeles Times

 

The Granville Towers, a French Normandy-style classic, is only seven stories. But the view from this penthouse — with windows in every room — spans the San Gabriel Mountains, the downtown skyline and Catalina Island.    (Click on ‘Continue Reading’ for more)

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(more…)

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Hollyhock House Restoration…

Monday, July 28th, 2008

State funding will aid restoration of L.A.’s Hollyhock House

 

 

By Amanda Covarrubias
Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
July 28, 2008

 

HOLLYWOOD – The city of Los Angeles will receive nearly $2 million in state funding to restore and transform the landmark Hollyhock House in Barnsdall Art Park into a gallery, officials said today.

 

The national historic landmark in Los Feliz was designed by architect Frank Lloyd Wright in the 1920s in a style he referred to as California Romanza. It was retrofitted and partially restored after undergoing extensive damage from the 1994 Northridge earthquake.

 

The $1.9 million in state funding will be used to complete and expand on that work, city officials said. Project Restore, a city agency, will oversee the renovation, which is expected to be completed in 2012.

 

“These funds will help us give it a proper restoration so that future generations can enjoy and admire its architecture,” said City Council President Eric Garcetti, who helped secure the state funding.

 

In addition to its central garden court, each major interior space of Hollyhock House adjoins an equivalent exterior space, connected either by glass doors, a porch, pergola or colonnade.

 

A series of rooftop terraces further extend the living space and provide views of the Los Angeles basin and the Hollywood Hills.

 

The house takes its name from the favorite flower of Aline Barnsdall, a philanthropist who commissioned the building. Aline Barnsdall gave Hollyhock House and 11 surrounding acres to the city in 1927 for use as a public art park in memory of her father, Theodore Barnsdall.

 

amanda.covarrubias@latimes.com

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The Laemmle Building

Thursday, May 1st, 2008

Hollywood and Vine:

A History

 

by Allan R. Ellenberger

 

Arguably the most famous intersection in the world, Hollywood and Vine sometimes disappoints tourists who search it out. Yesterday’s fire at the intersections northwest corner made me think about its history. The intersection first became famous in the 1930s because many of Hollywood’s important radio stations were located nearby.  “Brought to you from Hollywood and Vine” was a familiar opening to many early radio broadcasts.

 

Historic 1920s office buildings are located on three of its corners. On the northeast corner is the Equitable Building (1929), a Gothic Deco commercial building, designed by Aleck Curlett. The B. H. Dyas building (1927) on the southwest corner at one time housed The Broadway-Hollywood department store. It’s famous sign still stands on its roof. And on the southeast corner is the Taft Building (1923), by architects Walker & Eisen in the Renaissance Revival style. This building once housed offices for Charlie Chaplin, Will Rogers, Hedda Hopper, Photoplay magazine and the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

 

On the northwest corner is the building devasted by yesterdays fire. At first glance it may not be mistaken for a Hollywood landmark, however, it was built in 1932-1933 by Universal founder, Carl Laemmle and bore his name (Laemmle Building) for many years. Designed by famed architect, Richard Neutra in the International Style, the building has been altered many times over the decades (beginning in 1940) and no longer retains any of its original features.

 

Below are photos from the Laemmle Buildings past:

 

Vine Street at Hollywood Blvd. in 1907. The house on the left is the
approximate location of the Laemmle Building

 

The former Laemmle Building in the 1950s

 

The Laemmle Building’s (left) incarnation as a Howard Johnson’s Restaurant

 

 

 The former Laemmle Building in the 1990s

 

Currently, the building housed the Basque Nightclub and Restaurant (6263 Hollywood Blvd.), a popular celebrity hangout. Actress Lindsay Lohan recently celebrated her 21st birthday at Basque and rap star Kanye West partied there earlier in April. Scenes from the movie Ocean’s Eleven were filmed there and the property had recently been sold as part of a renovation renaissance in Hollywood.

 

 

 

As the intersection appeared yesterday morning (Al Seib/Los Angeles Times)

 

Sadly, the 75 year-old Laemmle Building’s future is unclear. It’s not known at this time if the building is a total loss and will be demolished or if it can be saved. Once it’s fate is known, it will be reported here.

 

 (Bob Chamberlain/Los Angeles Times)

 

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