Archive for May, 2013

L.A. Story at Hollywood Forever

Tuesday, May 28th, 2013

HOLLYWOOD EVENTS

PEN Center USA and Hollywood Forever proudly present: L.A. Story: Reading Event

.

LAStory_800a

 

.

Reading line-up announced for the event, which will take place at Hollywood Forever and celebrate writing in and about Los Angeles

.

Continuing its collaborative reading series, PEN Center USA will present. L.A. Story at Hollywood Forever on June 21, 2013. Doors for the event will open at 8pm. The reading will begin at 9pm and will feature Janet Fitch (Paint it Black, White Oleander), Rachel Kushner (The Flamethrowers, Telex From Cuba), Jim Krusoe (Parsifal, Iceland), Doug Kearney (Fear Some), and Jim Gavin (Middle Men). A book signing will follow the reading.

.

PEN Center USA, a literary nonprofit based in Beverly Hills, has a membership of more than 600 professional writers. PEN Center USA strives to protect the rights of writers around the world, to stimulate interest in the written word, and to foster a vital literary community among the diverse writers living in the western United States. PEN Center USA has a long successful, history planning literary events in and around Los Angeles.

.

Tickets for L.A. Story are $10 online and $15 at the door. Tickets are ON SALE NOW at http://hollywoodforever.ticketfly.com/

.

Location Address:

THE MASONIC LODGE AT HOLLYWOOD FOREVER

6000 Santa Monica Blvd.

Los Angeles, CA 90038

.

For more information on Hollywood Forever, please visit www.hollywoodforever.com or email events@hollywoodforever.com.

 _____________________________________________

.

 

Please follow and like us:

Can you identify this 1920s director?

Friday, May 24th, 2013

MYSTERY PHOTOS

Can you identify this 1920s director?

.

1920sdirector075

.

Does anyone recognize this man?

He is reportedly a director from the 1920s.

.

UPDATE

 

A Hollywoodland reader sent the photo below.

Do you think it’s him?

The director is named Graham Cutts.

Thanks Melissa.

.

Directorblog

 

______________________________

.

Please follow and like us:

Beatrice Dominguez: Valentino’s “La Bella Sevilla”

Friday, May 24th, 2013

HOLLYWOOD PROFILES

Beatrice Dominguez: Valentino’s “La Bella Sevilla”

.

dominguez

 .

.

By Allan R. Ellenberger

.

She was a vamp. With Spanish mantillas and high combs, and dancing to the sounds of a strumming guitar, she endeared herself to those she entertained. She was born Beatriz Dominguez on September 6, 1896 in San Bernardino, California. Descended from an old California Spanish family, a race of dons, her lineage can be traced back to old Castile who had been Americans for generations. Like her three older sisters, Beatriz was educated at Sacred Heart Convent, and like her younger sister Inez, she appeared in a few short films, but unlike Inez, she liked the medium. Her family, however, wanted her to be a doctor or lawyer; there had been no theatrical people or dancers in their ancestry. But dancing was in her blood. Her mother Petra was born in Sevilla and never had a dancing lesson, yet she simply danced. Beatrice learned to dance from her. “You see,” Beatriz said, “Spanish dances are all symbolical.” And from her, too, she inherited the priceless mantillas, combs, jewelry and embroidered shawls that she wore.

.

In 1915 and 1916, Beatriz danced her way into fame when she appeared at the Panama-Pacific Exposition in San Diego. Billed simply as “La Bella Sevilla,” she lent the old Castilian touch to the air of the place.  To the click of castanets and a swirl of silken skirts, through an open archway she danced to the tune of the classic La Jota, black eyes snapping as the applause of the expositions throng bought in more crowds. When Theodore Roosevelt saw her dance, he called her “California’s sweetheart—fairest dancing daughter of the dons.”  

.

.

exposition

.

.

While performing in San Diego, she had an uncredited role in the Douglas Fairbanks film, The Americano (1916). After the exposition, Beatrice returned to dancing in vaudeville.

.

“After I left San Diego,” Beatriz recalled, “and had danced at the Mission Inn in Riverside—I wished to act. I called at some of the studios and did not say that I was the premiere dancer at Balboa Park (San Diego). I simply registered as ‘La Bella Sevilla.’ Mr. O. H Davis, who was a vice-president of the Exposition, was appointed general manager of Universal. One day, when I called there, he suggested that I use my own name, because directors were rather afraid to employ a dancer because they reasoned that she could not act. I was baptized ‘Beatriz,’ but at the studios they have turned that into the American ‘Beatrice.’”

.

The newly rechristened ‘Beatrice’ returned to films in 1919 in a small role in the Rex Ingram picture, The Day She Paid (1919) followed by another Ingram film, Under Crimson Skies (1920). Carl Laemmle saw her and considered her “an exceptional motion picture type” and gave her a part in The Fire Cat (1921) at Universal. Beatrice became one of the first Hispanic actresses to receive screen billing and to be mentioned in the press. Then the film that she would be remembered for today was offered to her. “Beatrice Dominguez, a Spanish dancer, has been engaged to play in the Metro production of The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, which Rex Ingram is directing,” the local trade papers announced. The film starred the relative newcomer, Rudolph Valentino and his dancing the Tango with Beatrice glamorized the dance and gave him instant celebrity.

.

In December 1920 Beatrice appeared in the prologue to The Mark of Zorro starring Douglas Fairbanks during its seven week run at the Mission Theater. The following February she was filming The White Horseman (1921) with Art Acord when she collapsed with a ruptured appendix and was rushed to the Clara Barton Hospital at 447 South Olive Street. Doctors believed she would recover, but as with Valentino five years later, peritonitis set in; a second operation was necessary. She died from the complications of the operation on February 27, 1921. She was 24. One week later, The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse opened in New York City to rave reviews and made Rudolph Valentino a star, in part because of the Tango scene with Beatrice.

.

DOMINGUEZ-HOUSE

..

The home of Beatrice Dominguez at 2522 Elsinore Street in Los Angeles where her funeral was held. (PLEASE NOTE: This is a private home. Please do not disturb the residents)

.

.

Beatrice’s funeral was held at her home at 2522 Elsinore Street, where she lived with her mother and sister Inez. The funeral mass was held at the Plaza Church in old Los Angeles with burial at Calvary Cemetery.

..

.

dominguez-grave1

..

dominguez-grave2

 

.

At the time of her death, her role in The White Horseman was not yet completed, so they had to find a way to write her out of the remainder of the film. Her purpose in the film was to find a treasure. The director brought in a stand-in, of about the same height, dressed her in Beatrice’s costume and had her walk into the scene with her back to the camera and announce that she was called back to her home. She entrusted her mission to another, who was then responsible to find the treasure. Just before her death, she was signed to play the role of a Hindu girl in an adaptation of the Rudyard Kipling story, Without Benefit of Clergy at the Brunton Studios (now Paramount).

_________________________________________

.

.

Please follow and like us:

Steve Forrest Obituary

Friday, May 24th, 2013

OBITUARY

Steve Forrest, Performer on Film and TV’s ‘S.W.A.T.,’ Dies at 87

.

forrest-s

 .

By Margalit Fox
New York Times
May 23, 2013

Steve Forrest, a strapping actor known to television viewers as Lt. Dan Harrelson on the 1970s action series “S.W.A.T.,” died on Saturday in Thousand Oaks, Calif. He was 87. His family confirmed the death on Thursday.

.

Click here to continue reading the obituary for Steve Forrest

______________________________________

.

Please follow and like us:

New Book: Mae Murray: The Girl with the Bee-Stung Lips by Michael G. Ankerich

Tuesday, May 7th, 2013

BOOKS — NEW

Mae Murray: The Girl with the Bee-Stung Lips by Michael G. Ankerich

.

.

murraybook

..

.

Mae Murray (1885–1965), popularly known as “the girl with the bee-stung lips,” was a fiery presence in silent-era Hollywood. Renowned for her classic beauty and charismatic presence, she rocketed to stardom as a dancer in the Ziegfeld Follies, moving across the country to star in her first film, To Have and to Hold, in 1916. An instant hit with audiences, Murray soon became one of the most famous names in Tinseltown.

.

However, Murray’s moment in the spotlight was fleeting. The introduction of talkies, a string of failed marriages, a serious career blunder, and a number of bitter legal battles left the former star in a state of poverty and mental instability that she would never overcome.

.

In this intriguing biography, Michael G. Ankerich traces Murray’s career from the footlights of Broadway to the klieg lights of Hollywood, recounting her impressive body of work on the stage and screen and charting her rapid ascent to fame and decline into obscurity. Featuring exclusive interviews with Murray’s only son, Daniel, and with actor George Hamilton, whom the actress closely befriended at the end of her life, Ankerich restores this important figure in early film to the limelight.

.

Reviews

“A most compelling, detailed chronicle of the meteoric rise and fall of stage/silent movie star Mae Murray, as to both her roller-coaster professional career and chaotic personal life. This book will certainly be the definitive biography of the legendary Mae Murray.” — James Robert Parish, author of Fiasco: A History of Hollywood’s Iconic Flops

.

“Astounding. Mae Murray works on many levels. For those who know of her, it’s a revelation. At last, a reliable narrative of her life.” — Mel Neuhaus, film writer for Examiner.com

.

“Her long life is a lesson about those heady days of early Hollywood and the transience of fame.”–Library Journal

.

Click here to purchase at Amazon

.

About the Author

Former news reporter Michael G. Ankerich is author of The Sound of Silence: Conversations with 16 Film and Stage Personalities Who Bridged the Gap between Silents and Talkies and coauthor of The Real Joyce Compton: Behind the Dumb Blonde Movie Image.

__________________________________

.

Please follow and like us:

Ray Harryhausen Obituary

Tuesday, May 7th, 2013

OBITUARY

Ray Harryhausen dies at 92; special-effects legend

.

harryhausen

 

Ray Harryhausen pioneered stop-motion animation, creating classics such as ‘The Beast From 20,000 Fathoms,’ and ‘The 7th Voyage of Sinbad.’ Without his work, ‘there never would have been a “Star Wars” or a “Jurassic Park,”’ Steven Spielberg said.

.

By Dennis McLellan
Special to the Los Angeles Times
May 7, 2013
.

Ray Harryhausen, the stop-motion animation legend whose work on “The Beast From 20,000 Fathoms,” “Jason and the Argonauts” and other science fiction and fantasy film classics made him a cult figure who inspired later generations of filmmakers and special-effects artists, has died. He was 92.

.

Click here to continue reading the Los Angeles Times obituary for Ray Harryhausen

___________________________________

.

Please follow and like us:

George Hurrell at Laguna Art Museum

Sunday, May 5th, 2013

EVENTS

Laguna Art Museum presents early photographs and Hollywood glamour portraits by George Hurrell from 1925–1944

.

hurrell-1title

 .

Laguna Art Museum presents George Hurrell: Laguna to Hollywood, on display through May 19, in the museum’s upper level gallery. George Hurrell was a famed Hollywood glamour photographer with roots in Laguna Beach. The exhibition traces his beginnings as a photographer and his leap to photographing Hollywood stars of the 1930s and 40s. The exhibition presents a selection of over sixty works from 1925-1944 (mostly from the museum’s permanent collection), curated by Laguna Art Museum’s Curator of Early California Art, Janet Blake.

.

George Hurrell (1904–1992) was born in Covington, Kentucky, and studied painting at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Learning to photograph his paintings spurred an interest in photography as a medium. In 1924 he was befriended by Laguna Beach artist Edgar Payne and his wife, Elsie Palmer Payne, who were spending several months in Chicago after returning from a long European sojourn. The following spring, the Paynes motored back to California accompanied by Hurrell. After a short time in Los Angeles, Hurrell moved to Laguna Beach, living for a time in the vacant cottage of silent film director Malcolm St. Clair. He became part of the art community and developed close friendships with artists William Wendt and William Griffith. He began photographing the leading artists of the Laguna Beach Art Association, including, besides Griffith and Wendt, Anna Hills, Thomas Hunt, and Frank Cuprien. Laguna Art Museum traces its roots to the Laguna Beach Art Association.

.

It was in Laguna Beach that Hurrell met Florence “Pancho” Barnes, who, in turn, introduced him to silent movie star Ramon Novarro. Hurrell’s photographs of Barnes and Novarro caught the attention of Hollywood, and he moved there in 1927. By 1930 he was the head of the MGM portrait gallery. He was soon dubbed the “Grand Seigneur of the Hollywood Portrait.” He established his own studio on the Sunset Strip and later worked for Warner Bros. The museum’s collection contains many Hurrell photographs, including those of the early artists and other prominent people of Laguna Beach, as well as a portfolio of ten portraits of important Hollywood stars, including John Barrymore, Gary Cooper, Bette Davis, Clark Gable, Greta Garbo, Jean Harlow, and Katharine Hepburn.

.

hurrell-2banner

.

ABOUT LAGUNA ART MUSEUM

Laguna Art Museum is a museum of California art. Its mission is to collect, care  for, and exhibit works of art that were created by California artists or represent the life and history of the state. Through its permanent collection, its special loan exhibitions, its educational programs, and its library and archive, the museum enhances the public’s knowledge and appreciation of California art of all periods and styles, and encourages art-historical scholarship in this field.

.
Laguna Art Museum stands just steps from the Pacific Ocean in the beautiful city of Laguna Beach. The museum is proud to continue the tradition of the Laguna Beach Art Association, founded in 1918 by the early California artists who had discovered the town and transformed it into a vibrant arts community. The gallery that the association built in 1929 is part of today’s Laguna Art Museum.

.
MUSEUM INFORMATION

Laguna Art Museum

is located at

307 Cliff Drive in Laguna Beach,

on the corner of PCH and Cliff Drive,
next door to Las Brisas restaurant.
Hours:
Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Friday, Saturday: 11:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
Thursday: 11:00 a.m.-9:00 p.m.
Closed Wednesdays
Closed Fourth of July, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, and New Year’s Day

.
Admission:
General admission: $7.00
Students, seniors, and active military: $5.00
Children under 12: FREE
Museum members: FREE

 _______________________________________

.

Please follow and like us: