Archive for May, 2010

Dennis Hopper Obituary

Saturday, May 29th, 2010

OBITUARY

Dennis Hopper dies at 74; actor directed counterculture classic ‘Easy Rider’

 

 

 

Hopper made his acting debut in ‘Rebel Without a Cause’ in 1955. He later descended into years of drug and alcohol abuse, but made a comeback in 1986 with his Oscar-nominated role in ‘Hoosiers.’

 

Dennis McLellan
Los Angeles Times
May 29, 2010

 

Dennis Hopper, the maverick director and costar of the landmark 1969 counterculture film classic “Easy Rider” whose drug- and alcohol-fueled reputation as a Hollywood bad boy preceded his return to sobriety and a career resurgence in the films ” Hoosiers” and “Blue Velvet,” died Saturday. He was 74.

 

Click here to continue reading the Los Angeles Times obituary for Dennis Hopper

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Ben Kingsley gets Star on Walk of Fame

Saturday, May 29th, 2010

WALK OF FAME

Ben Kingsley honoured on Hollywood’s Walk of Fame

 

 

British Oscar-winning actor Ben Kingsley got his star on Hollywood’s Walk of Fame Thursday, a milestone in his long acting career he said he never suspected of achieving.

 

“Dear friends, standing here today amongst you is one of the many things I thought growing up in England that would never happen to me and it has and I’m thrilled,” Kingsley, 66, said at the unveiling ceremony attended by his wife, fellow actor Bruce Willis and around 100 admirers.

 

The unveiling of the 2,410th star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame came on the eve of the release of Kingsley’s latest film, “Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time,” based on the video game of the same name. Kingsley plays the evil nobleman Nizam in the film.

 

The four-time Oscar nominee clinched Hollywood’s top award in 1983 for his riveting, internationally acclaimed performance in “Gandhi.” He was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II in 2002.

 

Born in Scarborough, Britain as Krishna Pandit Bhanji to a British mother and Indian-origin father, Kingsley made his stage debut in London in 1966 as the narrator of “A Smashing Day,” which was produced by former Beatles manager Brian Epstein.

 

After changing his name fearing his original one would hurt his career, Kingsley joined the Royal Shakespeare Company in 1967 and made his film debut in a supporting role in “Fear Is the Key” (1972).

 

In February, he made his debut in a Bollywood film – the thriller “Teen Patti” (Three Cards), in which he plays a brilliant mathematician.

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Gary Coleman Obituary

Friday, May 28th, 2010

OBITUARY

Gary Coleman dies at 42; child star of hit sitcom ‘Diff’rent Strokes’

 

 

 (Associated Press)

 

The actor dies in Utah days after a brain hemorrhage. After soaring to fame in the late 1970s, his post-TV-series life included a stint as a shopping mall security guard and an unlikely run for California governor.

 

By Dennis McLellan,
Los Angeles Times
May 28, 2010

 

Gary Coleman, who soared to fame in the late 1970s as the child star of the hit sitcom “Diff’rent Strokes” and whose post-TV-series life included a stint as a shopping mall security guard and an unlikely run for California governor, died Friday. He was 42.

 

Click here to continue reading the Los Angeles Times obituary for Gary Coleman

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T-Bone Walker’s 100th Birthday

Friday, May 28th, 2010

100th BIRTHDAY

T-Bone Walker

 

 

 

AMERICAN SINGER

 

 

 

Click below to hear T-Bone Walker sing “Don’t Throw Your Love on Me so Strong”

 

 

 

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Valentino’s psychic message

Wednesday, May 26th, 2010

RUDOLPH VALENTINO

Did Valentino speak from the grave?

 

 

 

  

By Allan R. Ellenberger

 

Rudolph Valentino. One of the most popular film actors while he lived evidently had aspirations to act on the legitimate stage once he was dead. Yes that is correct, at least according to his ex-wife, Natacha Rambova who made that revelation – and others – three months after Valentino’s death.

 

Rambova, whose real name was Winifred Hudnut, arrived in the states from Europe on November 25, 1926 with George B. Wehner, who claimed he was a medium associated with the American Society for Psychical Research.

 

The essence of Valentino’s revelations concerning his activities since his death according to Rambova and Wehner were:

 

  1. Valentino was a citizen of the astral plane.
  2. He hopes to become a legitimate actor there.
  3. He met Enrico Caruso and heard the late tenor sing.
  4. He visited theaters (on the worldly plane) where his films were being shown and was pleased at the “flattery” he sensed in the minds of the audience.
  5. Everything in the theater, however, seemed strange to him as he could “see through all things.”
  6. His wish was that his will (which left nothing to Rambova) to be carried out as executed and believes it would be done.
  7. He made no mentions in his “communications” of Pola Negri, who had announced at his death that they had been engaged to be married.

 

Rambova explained this last point, apparently to her own satisfaction, by saying that Valentino only “spoke to her of significant things and subjects that mean something.”

 

 

 

 

Wehner explained that while he was at Rambova’s chateau outside Paris he received a psychic message that Valentino was going to die. Later, he said, he received a “spiritual message” from Valentino calling for Rambova. He said she replied by cable and received a reply by radio. All this was, of course, prior to the actor’s death.

 

While Valentino’s body was lying in state in the funeral church here, besieged by thousands of admirers, Wehner said he received a “communication” from the screen star deploring the fact that he had “recognized and spoken” to many of those who filed past his bier, but that they had not known he was “addressing” them.

 

Of course, Pola Negri could not let this pass without responding. She and Valentino’s brother, Alberto, both said that they were not impressed with the “message from the astral plane” which Rambova claimed she received from her late husband.

 

When Alberto was told of her statements, he shrugged his shoulders and said:

 

“I think Rudolph would have communicated with his own brother if he had any message to send from the other side. I never have heard of Wehner nor the American Society of Psychical Research, with which the medium claims to be associated. It always was our belief that someone friendly to all concerned must be the medium through which thoughts after death must be presented.”

 

 

 

 

Pola, who announced after Valentino’s death that they had been engaged to be married, stopped working at the studio long enough to say:

 

“There has been so much trickery in the name of spiritualism that I think only direct contact with the departed one would be convincing. In this particular instance, regarding my own recent loss, I feel that the subject is altogether too sacred to be commercialized, and I cannot help thinking that this publicity that we have been reading is unworthy of the grand dignity of the great beyond.”

 

Jean Acker, Valentino’s first wife also commented by saying that the actor did not believe in spirit messages and expressed the opinion that none had been received.

 

“Rudolph Valentino did not believe in spirit messages,” Acker said. “He was intelligent, and if he had lived the world would have heard of him in other ways. Even if such messages were received, they should have been too sacred to broadcast. “

 

Bess Houdini, whose magician-husband had died only a few weeks earlier, and who also fought against so-called psychic charlatans, spoke about Rambova’s claim:

 

“There is no doubt that Miss Rambova believes the messages to be from Valentino,” said Mrs. Houdini. “I also have received messages through mediums supposedly from Houdini, but those messages were an insult to my intelligence.”

 

“Would a man with the brilliant mind Houdini possessed send such an insane message as ‘I am very happy here,’ and talk about wills? No, Houdini’s message will be worthwhile, and until some medium who claims he or she is favored by our Almighty Father to communicate with our beloved dead speaks those sacred words of our compact, I will be skeptical and promptly consign all other messages to the waste basket.

 

“Miss Rambova also claims that only real love counts over there. What was our love, our Holy love; thirty-two years of love and devotion? Surely, if love counts, I should be blessed with the gift of speaking to my dead. Surely, if any beloved dead speaks to these mediums, who claim communications, he would say that I am waiting to hear and not the nonsense they say he speaks.

 

“I have in my possession a priceless heritage – from my dead – letters; letters that he wrote; fifteen, one each year, not to be opened until his death, letters that breathed love and devotion. They were read by me after we had laid him beside his beloved parents and each priceless gem read:

 

“Sweetheart mine, when you read this I will be at rest, at rest beside my sainted parents. Do not grieve, dear heart, I have just gone ahead and will be waiting for you – yours in life, death and ever after.”

 

 

 

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Art Linkletter Obituary

Wednesday, May 26th, 2010

OBITUARY

Art Linkletter dies at 97: broadcasting pioneer created ‘Kids Say the Darndest Things’

 

  

Linkletter was a radio host when he began interviewing children to get their unvarnished utterances. He went on to TV, became an author and entrepreneur, and was an advocate for senior citizens remaining active.

 

By Myrna Oliver and Valerie J. Nelson
Los Angeles Times
May 27, 2010

 

Art Linkletter, the radio and television talk-show pioneer who was best known for eliciting hilarious remarks from the mouths of babes and who late in life was a popular motivational speaker and author, challenging seniors to live as zestfully as he did, has died. He was 97.

 

 Click here to continue reading the Los Angeles Times for Art Linkletter

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Scatman Crothers’ 100th Birthday

Sunday, May 23rd, 2010

100th BIRTHDAY

Scatman Crothers

 

 

(LIFE)

 

AMERICAN SINGER AND ACTOR

 

  • BORN: May 23, 1910, Terre Haute, Indiana
  • DIED: November 22, 1986, Van Nuys, California
  • CAUSE OF DEATH: Pneumonia and lung cancer

 

 

Click below for Scatman Crothers performing “Ain’t She Sweet”

 

 

 

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Artie Shaw’s 100th Birthday

Sunday, May 23rd, 2010

100th BIRTHDAY

Artie Shaw

 

 

  

AMERICAN MUSICIAN

 

 

 

Click below to hear Artie Shaw and his orchestra

 

 

 

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Where is Claire Windsor – Update!

Thursday, May 20th, 2010

HOLLYWOOD STORIES

The disappearance of Claire Windsor – UPDATE

 

 

 

UPDATE: A reader from Claire Windsor’s birthplace has provided some additional information behind the story of Windsor’s disappearance:

 

“Greetings from Cawker City, Kansas; home town of Claire Windsor and the World’s Largest Ball of Twine!  In later years, Claire confessed that Lois Weber had hatched the plan for Claire’s disappearance to get a little publicity for her upcoming film.  Poor Chaplin was not let in on the secret and it spoiled Claire and Charlie’s personal relationship.  Little Billy Windsor, Claire’s only son, learned well from the experience and later, in an effort to get his mother’s attenetion, fabricated a story that men had come to the front door of thier house and tried to kidnap him!

 

“Claire’s 30 hour dissapearance could have turned into career ending negative publicity if the police chief’s explanation of events had been believed.  He had surmized that Claire had probably attended a ‘snow party’ and had lost her memory ! ! !  I guess even back then, drugs were a big problem in Hollywood. “

 

By Allan R. Ellenberger

 

Claire Windsor, a Kansas-born music student who came to Hollywood to seek her fortune, was pulled out of the ranks of extras by director Lois Weber, who was casting To Please One Woman (1920) and offered her a role. An immediate success, the blonde actress became one of the busiest and best-known performers in Hollywood.

 

In the summer of 1921, with only four films in release in the previous six months, Windsor was enjoying her new found success as a leading lady. On Tuesday, July 12, during filming of The Blot, also directed by Weber, Windsor took a deserved day off to go horseback riding in the Hollywood hills. Early that morning she rented a horse and headed alone through the Cahuenga Pass.

 

When Windsor did not turn up at home (1042 Third Avenue) that evening, family members called the Hollywood police, who employed an airplane to search the hills the following morning. A group of Boy Scouts who were camping in the hills also aided in the search as did many of her friends. Charlie Chaplin offered a reward leading to her location.

 

By eight o’clock on Wednesday evening, Windsor had been missing for 36 hours when Stella Dodge, who lived at the intersection of Highland and Cahuenga (now part of the Hollywood Freeway), heard moans outside her home. She investigated and found Windsor lying on the lawn underneath her window. Dodge helped Windsor into her house and called Dr. C.W. Cook and the Hollywood police. An ambulance arrived and took her to Angelus Hospital at 1925 S. Trinity Street (demolished). When found, she was wearing her riding habit, which was badly torn by thorns, and she still had on her riding gloves.

 

A thorough examination at the hospital revealed the only external injury was an abrasion on the back of her left ear and exposure and hunger due to her long isolation in the hills. Her nose was bleeding which suggested possible internal injuries. Her pulse was low and she was unable to speak until the following morning.

 

It was Dr. Cook’s opinion that Windsor was thrown from her horse, suffering an injury to the back of her head, and had wandered about in the Hollywood hills until she was found semiconscious. Chaplin and other film friends rushed to the hospital once it was learned she was found.

 

Of course, Windsor recuperated and continued a long career that spanned three decades, 50 silent films and seven talkies. Claire Windsor died at age 80 from a heart attack on October 23, 1972 at Good Samaritan Hospital. She is buried at Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Glendale.

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Hollywood rescues

Wednesday, May 19th, 2010

BLOGS

10 Hollywood rescues to die for

 

Backdraft rescue

 

 

I was sent the following article from the Fire Science Schools that is posted on their blog:

 

“They’ll have you on the edge of your seat, biting your nails and cheering them on — that’s the power of Hollywood rescues. Rescue scenes elicit these types of feelings, as movie viewers idolize heroes and dream of being rescued by firefighters, police officers and the average Joe. Believable or not, Hollywood rescue scenes are iconic in pop culture and paint the picture of heroes we see worth imitating. In no particular order, here are 10 Hollywood rescues to die for:”

 

Take a moment and check out their blog and continue reading their top ten Hollywood rescues by clicking on the link below:

 

FireScienceSchools

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