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Glenn Close Wants an Oscar…

Posted by Allan Ellenberger on Feb 27th, 2009
2009
Feb 27

 ENTERTAINMENT NEWS

 Glenn Close: ‘I still want an Oscar’

 

Glenn Close

  

When Hollywood wants a bitch, they call Glenn Close, 62, thanks to films such as Fatal Attraction. She has won numerous awards but never an Oscar despite five nominations.    (Click on ‘Continue Reading’ for me)

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Obit: Clarence Swensen

Posted by Allan Ellenberger on Feb 26th, 2009
2009
Feb 26

OBITUARY

‘Oz’ Munchkin soldier Clarence Swensen dead at 91

 

Clarence Swensen

  

BY PHILIP POTEMPA
ppotempa@nwitimes.com
Thursday, February 26, 2009

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Clarence Swensen, who played a Munchkin soldier in the 1939 MGM film classic “The Wizard of Oz” and annually attended the Porter County Wizard of Oz Festival, died Wednesday evening at his home near Austin, Texas. He was 91.    (Click on ‘Continue Reading’ for more)

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Oscar Winners at Hollywood Forever: Part II…

Posted by Allan Ellenberger on Feb 24th, 2009
2009
Feb 24

 HOLLYWOOD FOREVER CEMETERY

Academy Award Winners!

PART TWO

 

Victor Young

 Victor Young, postumous Best Music Academy Award

  

By Allan R. Ellenberger

 

It probably comes as no surprise that there are many Academy Award recipients residing at Hollywood Forever Cemetery. Many of Hollywood’s film pioneers rest there including several Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences founders such as, Douglas Fairbanks, Cecil B. De Mille, Jeanie Macpherson, Carey Wilson, Frank E. Woods, Charles H. Christie and Jesse L. Lasky.

 

Of those interred at Hollywood Forever, there are 45 nominees that received a total of 178 nominations. Of that number there are 33 awards that were received by 27 winners. The following are the recipients in the Best Cinematography, Best Music, and Best Editing categories and a special recognition.

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BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY

    

 

 

 

 

 

GEORGE S. BARNES

Best Cinematography, Black-and-White

 

Rebecca (1940)

 

Total Nominations: 8

 

 

George Barnes

 

 

 

TONY GAUDIO

Best Cinematography

 

Anthony Adverse (1936)

 

Total Nominations: 6

 

 

Tony Gaudio grave

 

 

MILTON KRASNER

Best Cinematography, Color

 

Three Coins in the Fountain (1954)

 

Total Nominations: 7

 

 

Milton Krasner

UNMARKED GRAVE

 

ARTHUR C. MILLER

(1) Best Cinematography, Black-and-White

 

How Green Was My Valley (1941)

(2) Best Cinematography, Black-and-White

 

The Song of Bernadette (1943)

(3) Best Cinematography, Black-and-White

 

Anna and the King of Siam (1946)

 

Total Nominations: 7

 

 

 

 

Oscar

UNMARKED GRAVE

 

HAL ROSSON

Honorary Award

 

The Garden of Allah (1936)

Shared with W. Howard Greene. For the color cinematography of the Selznick International Production The Garden of Allah (plaque).

 

Total Nominations: 5

 

 

Hal Rosson grave

 

 

GREGG TOLAND

Best Cinematography, Black-and-White

 

Wuthering Heights (1939)

 

Total Nominations: 6

 

 

Gregg Toland

 

  

BEST MUSIC

 

 

LENNIE HAYTON

(1) Best Music, Scoring of a Musical Picture

 

On The Town (1949)

Shared with Roger Edens

(2) Best Scoring of a Musical Picture

 

Hello Dolly! (1969)

Shared with Lionel Newman

 

Total Nominations: 6

 

 

 

 

Lennie Hayton

 

BRONISLAW KAPER

Best Music, Scoring of a Dramatic or Comedy Picture

 

Lili (1953)

 

Total Nominations: 3

 

 

Bronislau Kaper

 

 

ERICH WOLFGANG KORNGOLD

Best Music, Original Score

 

The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938)

 

Total Nominations: 3

 

 

Erich Wolfgang Korngold grave

 

 

NELSON RIDDLE

Best Music, Scoring Original Song Score and/or Adaptation

 

The Great Gatsby (1974)

 

Total Nominations: 5

 

 

Nelson Riddle

 

FRANZ WAXMAN

(1) Best Music, Scoring of a Dramatic or Comedy Picture

 

Sunset Boulevard (1950)

(2) Best Music, Scoring of a Dramatic or Comedy Picture

 

A Place in the Sun (1951)

 

Total Nominations: 12

 

 

 

Franz Waxman

 

VICTOR YOUNG

Best Music, Scoring of a Dramatic or Comedy Picture

 

Around the World in Eighty Days (1956)

Postumously

 

Total Nominations: 22

 

 

 

Victor Young

 

BEST FILM EDITING

 

 

 

ANNE BAUCHENS

Best Film Editing

 

Northwest Mounted Police (1940)

 

Total Nominations: 4

 

 

Anne Bauchens

 

 

 

FRANK P. KELLER

Best Film Editing

 

Bullitt (1968)

 

Total Nominations: 4

 

 

Frank P. Keller's grave

 

 

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS

 

 

 

HATTIE MCDANIEL

Best Actress in a Supporting Role

 

Gone With the Wind  (1939)

 

Total Nominations: 1

 

(Hattie McDaniel resides in Rosedale Cemetery)

 

 

Hattie McDaniel

CENOTAPH

 

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Monroe’s Marker Defaced…

Posted by Allan Ellenberger on Feb 23rd, 2009
2009
Feb 23

LOS ANGELES CEMETERIES 

Marilyn Monroe’s grave marker vandalized!

 

  Marilyn Monroe's defaced grave

 Marilyn Monroe’s grave marker (Courtesy of Gary L. Hill)

 

Some ghoul has defaced the grave marker of actress Marilyn Monroe at Westwood Cemetery. This photo, which was taken by a friend about 2 weeks ago, shows that either a key or knife may have been used to deface the actresses’ marker. It’s not known if it has been repaired or replaced. If anyone has that information, please post a comment.

 

What can be said about a person that would do something like this to Monroe’s grave marker or to anyone’s grave for that matter.

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In Memoriam…

Posted by Allan Ellenberger on Feb 23rd, 2009
2009
Feb 23

AMPAS HISTORY

IN MEMORIAM

 

Just a few of the stars who passed away last year that were not mentioned in last evenings Academy Award ceremony.

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Lest we forget…

 

Ann Savage

ANN SAVAGE (1921-2008)

 

Eartha Kitt

EARTHA KITT (1927-2008)

 

Sam Bottoms

SAM BOTTOMS (1955-2008)

 

 

Robert Prosky

ROBERT PROSKY (1930-2008)

 

Beverly Garland

BEVERLY GARLAND (1926-2008)

 

Irving Brecher

IRVING BRECHER (1914-2008)

 

Yma Sumac

YMA SUMAC (1922-2008)

  

Edie Adams

 EDIE ADAMS (1927-2008)

 

Anita Page

ANITA PAGE (1910 – 2008)

 

Fred Crane

FRED CRANE (1918-2008)

 

getty-estelle1

ESTELLE GETTY (1923-2008)

 

George Carlin

GEORGE CARLIN (1937-2008)

 

Harvey Korman

HARVEY KORMAN (1927-2008)

 

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The Academy Awards…

Posted by Allan Ellenberger on Feb 22nd, 2009
2009
Feb 22

AWARDS

Slumdog Millionaire’ fulfills its Oscar destiny

 

The Academy Awards (MSNBC)

 The Kodak Theatre is seen before the start of the 81st Academy Awards in Los Angeles on Sunday, Feb. 22, 2009. (Damian Dovarganes / AP)
 

Rags-to-riches tale wins best picture; Penn, Winslet take top acting honors

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The Associated Press
Feb. 22, 2009
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LOS ANGELES – “Slumdog Millionaire” took the best-picture Academy Award and seven other Oscars on Sunday, including director for Danny Boyle, whose ghetto-to-glory story paralleled the film’s unlikely rise to Hollywood’s summit.

 

The other top winners: Kate Winslet, best actress for the Holocaust-themed drama “The Reader”; Sean Penn, best actor for the title role of “Milk”; Heath Ledger, supporting actor for “The Dark Knight”; and Penelope Cruz, supporting actress for “Vicky Cristina Barcelona.”    (Click on ‘Continue Reading’ for more)

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Ledger a Cultural Icon?

Posted by Allan Ellenberger on Feb 21st, 2009
2009
Feb 21

FILM HISTORY

Ledger’s legacy: Will he become a cultural icon?

 

Michelle Williams and Heath Ledger

  

It’s hard to shake the image of James Dean when thinking about Ledger

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MSNBC

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NEW YORK (AP) – It was a decade ago, and director Gil Junger was seeking fresh talent for his upcoming movie, “10 Things I Hate About You.” He’d already seen 250 or 300 kids. In walked a young Australian TV actor looking for work.

 

After a quick line reading and a bit of improv, “I was stunned,” Junger says now. Certain he was looking at someone with enough raw magnetism to be a movie star, he turned to his casting people. “Hire him immediately,” he recalls saying of Heath Ledger.    (Click on ‘Continue Reading’ for more)

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Oscar Winners at Hollywood Forever…

Posted by Allan Ellenberger on Feb 19th, 2009
2009
Feb 19

 HOLLYWOOD FOREVER CEMETERY

Academy Award Winners!

PART ONE

 

Janet Gaynor and Oscar

 Janet Gaynor the first Best Actress

 

By Allan R. Ellenberger

 

It probably comes as no surprise that there are many Academy Award recipients residing at Hollywood Forever Cemetery. Many of Hollywood’s film pioneers rest there including several Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences founders such as, Douglas Fairbanks, Cecil B. De Mille, Jeanie Macpherson, Carey Wilson, Frank E. Woods, Charles H. Christie and Jesse L. Lasky.

 

Of those interred at Hollywood Forever, there are 45 nominees that received a total of 178 nominations. Of that number there are 33 awards that were received by 27 winners. The following are the recipients in the Best Picture, Best Actress, Best Actor, Best Supporting Actor, Best Director, and Best Screenplay categories and the Honorary and Irving G. Thalberg Awards.

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BEST PICTURE

 

 

 

CECIL B. DE MILLE

Best Picture

 

The Greatest Show on Earth (1952)

 

 

 

Total Nominations: 3

 

 

dsc_0019

 

 

 

BEST ACTRESS

 

 

 

JANET GAYNOR

Best Actress in a Leading Role

 

7th Heaven (1927)

Also for Street Angel (1928) and Sunrise (1927)

 

Total Nominations: 2

 

 

Janet Gaynor grave

 

 

 

BEST ACTOR

 

 

 

PETER FINCH

Best Actor in a Leading Role

 

Network (1976)

Nomination and award were posthumous. Finch became the first posthumous winner in an acting category.

 

Total Nominations: 2

 

 

Peter Finch's grave

 

PAUL MUNI

Best Actor in a Leading Role

 

The Story of Louis Pasteur (1935)

 

Total Nominations: 6

 

 

Paul Muni grave

 

 

 

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR

 

 

 

JOSEPH SCHILDKRAUT

Best Actor in a Supporting Role

 

The Life of Emile Zola (1937)

 

Total Nominations: 1

 

 

Joseph Schildkraut

 

 

 

BEST DIRECTOR

 

 

 

VICTOR FLEMING

Best Director

 

Gone With the Wind (1939)

 

Total Nominations: 1

 

 

Victor Fleming grave

 

 

 

JOHN HUSTON

Best Director

 

The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948)

 

Total Nominations: 5

 

 

John Huston grave

 

 

 

BEST SCREENPLAY

 

 

PIERRE COLLINGS

(1) Best Writing, Original Story

 

The Story of Louis Pasteur (1935)

Shared with Sheridan Gibney

(2) Best Writing, Screenplay

 

The Story of Louis Pasteur (1935)

Shared with Sheridan Gibney

 

Total Nominations: 2

 

 

 

 

Pierre Collings grave

 

 GEORGE FROESCHEL

Best Writing, Screenplay

 

Mrs. Miniver (1942)

Shared with James Hilton, Claudine West, Arthur Wimperis

 

Total Nominations: 2

 

 

George Froeschel grave

 

 

 

 

JOHN HUSTON

Best Writing, Screenplay

 

The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948)

 

Total Nominations: 8

 

 

 

John Huston's grave

 

 

MICHAEL KANIN

Best Writing, Original Screenplay

 

Woman of the Year (1942)

Shared with Ring Lardner, Jr.

 

Total Nominations: 2

 

 

Michael Kanin

 

 

SONYA LEVIEN

Best Writing, Story and Screenplay

 

Interrupted Melody (1955)

Shared with William Ludwig

 

Total Nominations: 2

 

 

Sonya Levien

 

 

DUDLEY NICHOLS

Best Writing, Screenplay

 

The Informer (1935)

Refused to accept his award because of the antagonism between several industry guilds and the academy over union matters. This marked the first time an Academy Award had been declined. Academy records show that Dudley was in possession of an Oscar statuette by 1949.

 

Total Nominations: 4

 

 

Dudley Nichols

 

 

 

 

IRVING G. THALBERG AWARD

 

 

 

 

CECIL B. DE MILLE

 

Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award

 

1952

 

 

 

Cecil B. DeMille

 

 

 

 

SIDNEY FRANKLIN

 

Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award

 

1943

 

 

Sidney Franklin's grave

 

 

 

HONORARY AWARD

 

 

 

DOUGLAS FAIRBANKS

 

Commemorative Award

 

Recognizing the unique and outstanding contribution of Douglas Fairbanks, first president of the Academy, to the international development of the motion picture (Commemorative Award).

 

  

Fairbanks tomb

 

 

   

 NEXT WEEK: PART TWO

Cinematographers, Composers, Film editors

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Hollywood Developer Files for Bankruptcy…

Posted by Allan Ellenberger on Feb 19th, 2009
2009
Feb 19

HOLLYWOOD NEWS

Hollywood’s First Ghost Building? Madrone Developer Files for Bankruptcy

 

By Dakota
Curbed LA
February 19, 2009

 

2009.02.constmad.jpg This one was coming: Southern California homebuilder John Laing, which has been pretty mum amid plenty of damning reports, has filed for Chapter 11. Bloomberg News reports that WL Homes LLC, which owns John Laing Homes, filed Chapter 11 documents today in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Wilmington, Delaware. Via the newswire: “Irvine, California-based WL Homes, which also does business as John Laing Homes, traces its history to 1848, when its predecessor was a homebuilder in the U.K. WL Homes was formed in 1998 when John Laing merged with Watt Homes, according to court documents.” According to the filings, the company blamed the collapse of the real estate market and listed assets of more than $1 billion and debt of $500 million-$1 billion. Last month, the company stopped work on the Hollywood Madrone, that 180-unit condominium development at the corner of Hollywood Blvd. and La Brea Ave.  

 

The company is behind the Element (pictured) and Indigo in the Marina Del Rey arts district, both of which are completed. According to John Laing’s web site, there are three units left in Indigo. Element also has sold some units, but it’s not clear to us how many have moved.

 

Additionally, the company is behind Icon project in Playa Vista. Stopping by Icon last weekend, we were told by a sales rep that only four units are left for sale in the development. The sale agent doesn’t keep regular hours and is available by appointment only.

 

Additionally, Emaar Properties owns Beverly West, that under-construction luxury condominium rising on Wilshire Blvd. Last month, real estate agent Brian Adler, who is representing the project, told us that Emaar Properties directly controls that project, rather than John Laing. It’s not immediately clear what’s going on with that project.

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The First Oscar…

Posted by Allan Ellenberger on Feb 17th, 2009
2009
Feb 17

AMPAS HISTORY

Emil Jannings’ Oscar

 

Emil Jannings and his Oscar

  

By Allan R. Ellenberger

Emil Jannings, one of Germany’s most favorite actors, was Swiss-born and was raised in Germany as a child. An undisciplined student, his first ambition was to be an actor, however a close friend who was in the Navy, convinced him to run away and go to sea. He eventually returned and tried to obey his parents wishes to be an engineer but soon ran off again and joined a theatrical road company. This time he was returned home by the police, but his father thought a good dose of theatrical hardship would cure him of his dramatic ideas and allowed him to continue with his pursuit.

For several years he traveled with one company or another eventually becoming a stock member at Bremen and Leipzig. For some time Jannings was with the Darmstadt Royal Theatre in Berlin, where he played in Shakespeare, Ibsen, Strindberg and Goethe plays. There he made the acquaintance of Robert Wiene, who would later become the producer of Caligari. He soon played in a series of one-reelers in which one of the directors was a young Ernst Lubitsch 

Emil Jannings in The Last Laugh

Emil Jannings in The Last Laugh (1924)

In F.W. Murnau’s, The Last Laugh (1924), in which Jannings plays an old man who sees his world fall about him, he caused critics to rave about him. After his success in Faust (1926), again with Murnau, he came to the United States for Paramount and appeared in The Way of All Flesh (1927), The Street of Sin (1928), The Last Command (1928), The Patriot (1928) and Sins of the Father (1928).

In 1929, the first year of the Academy Awards, Jannings won a Best Actor award for his performances in the The Way of All Flesh (1927), in which he played an embittered family man, and The Last Command (1928), in which he was an exiled Russian general reduced to playing bit parts in war films.

The first Academy Awards ceremony was held on May 16, 1929. However, at that time talking pictures had arrived and Jannings became one of that group of foreign actors who, because of their accent, was suddenly forced to abandon his career in the United States.

 Emil Jannings' Oscar

 The first Academy Award (kori.bustard/Flickr)

Since the actor was returning to Germany on April 27 – before the banquet was to be held in the Blossom Room of the Roosevelt Hotel – he asked the Academy if he could receive his gold statuette early. The fledgling organization agreed, making his the very first Academy Award ever presented.

The remainder of Jannings film work was done in Germany. During World War II, it became apparent that Jannings had become a favorite of the Nazi government, particularly since he was one of a handful of people entrusted by Propaganda Minister Joseph Goebbels with running that phase of the film industry most closely dominated by the Hitler regime. After the war he was not seen on the screen again.  

Emil Jannnings' Oscar

 Emil Jannings’ Academy Award at the Berlin Film Museum (Jacob.Theo/Flickr)

Emil Jannings died at his home in Strobl, Austria from liver cancer complicated by pneumonia on January 3, 1950. He was buried at Saint Wolfgang Friedhof Cemetery. The very first Academy Award won by Jannings is currently on display at the Berlin Film Museum.

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